Discussion:
You don't hear or see much about the case of the "FBI SPIES IN THE SWP" today...
(too old to reply)
dusty
2012-01-07 08:11:15 UTC
Permalink
Funny how you don't hear or see much about this today from either of
the two extant "IC" fragments, even though both (the "SEP" and "WRP")
still uphold it and the "SWP" is still active and, I note, includes in
its leadership figures, several of those named in the document below.

Maybe as they are now in the NWO Globalist Left they have - to coin an
appropriate metaphor - "buried the hatchet"...

Now read on...

International Committee of the Fourth International

FBI SPIES IN THE SWP (USA)

The strange group from Carleton College, Minnesota

LABOUR REVIEW Vol. III No 3
pp. 139 - 149

When Joseph Hansen died on January 17, 1979, he left behind a network
of secret police agents in the leadership of his revisionist Socialist
Workers Party (USA). This group of agents constitutes a tremendous
danger to the Fourth International, the international working class
and the oppressed masses. They function not only as domestic
stoolpigeons within the American labour movement, but as the
organisers and instigators of provocations against revolutionary
movements all over the world.
The centre of this conspiracy is the weekly magazine,
'Intercontinental Press', which was founded by Joseph Hansen and is
published in the national headquarters of the SWP in New York City. It
is the nerve centre of an international network of skilled and
ruthless police spies such as FAUSTO AMADOR, the agent of ex-dictator
Somoza, who was billed by 'Intercontinental Press' as 'a leading Latin
American Trotskyist (November 27, 1977).
The agents inside the leadership of the SWP enjoy unlimited backing
from the US government. A Federal court order that the files of some
of these agents be released was first defied by the US Attorney
General and then overturned by a higher court. The government is now
seeking legislation that would impose a seven-year moratorium on the
exposure of informants' files under the Freedom of Information Act.
Simultaneously, the SWP has decided to drop its suit to uncover the
names of hundreds of agents within its 'top offices' and membership in
exchange for a cash settlement with the government.
The International Committee of the Fourth International is determined
to expose the present functioning agents in the SWP -just as the late
Joseph Hansen was exposed. Who are they, how were they recruited, who
trained them, where did they come from?
In recent weeks the four-year investigation into 'Security and the
Fourth International' has entered a completely new field of research.
It has temporarily left the skyscraper metropolis of New York City,
the steamy suburbs of Mexico City, the grey granite US National
Archives Building in Washington, DC, and the pre-war record centres of
Western Europe. The investigation has travelled lo the Mid-west of the
United States to the small, sleepy rural town of Northfield in the
state of Minnesota. The pride of the upper middle class who live there
is Carleton College, an elite private university set in idyllic
surroundings of vast lawns, gardens and playing fields.
While the other numerous state colleges have few restrictions on
admissions, low tuition fees and a large intake of working-class
youth, Carleton is a strictly exclusive institution. It is expensive,
its students are creamed from 'the best and brightest' and it
specialises in the 'liberal arts'. Applicants are primarily from
bourgeois and well-off families who want their sons and daughters to
'get on in life' and to make the right connections. Each potential
student is obliged to submit an autobiographical essay with his or her
application form. These are studied by a staff of admission officers
who are skilled at spotting those who can be trusted to uphold 'the
American way' and weeding out the 'undesirables'.
Carleton's Board of Trustees consists largely of the most reactionary
industrialists and bankers in the United States. During the 1950s and
early 1960s, the President of Carleton College was Lawrence Gould, an
explorer and admirer of the World Federalist schemes championed by the
dean of CIA agents, Cord Meyer Jr. The official philosophy at Carleton
during their period was based on a fervent anti-communist liberalism.
It preached on behalf of 'responsible' free enterprise against the
'horrors of totalitarian collectivism'. As the conservatism of the
Eisenhower years gave way to the crusading anti-communism of the
Kennedy administration, it was common for students from the middle
class to enrol in government service -anything from the so-called
'Peace Corps' to the CIA — in order to prosecute the 'war against
communism'. Carleton College was no exception.
Our attention is now concentrated on a group of 11 people in the
leadership of the SWP: Jack Barnes, Mary-Alice Waters, Elisabeth
Stone, John Benson, Doug Jenness, Caroline Lund, Larry Settle, Barbara
Mattson, Cindy Jaquith, Dan Styron and Paul Eidsvik. All these
individuals — with the sole exception of Eidsvik — have served as
members of the SWP Political Committeee, National Committee, or as
alternates. Six of them are presently members of the Political
Committee: Barnes, Waters, Stone, Jenness, Seigle and Jaquith. They
have all been re-nominated to serve again on a revised Political
Committee of 16 which is to be elected at the SWP convention at
Oberlin, Ohio, this month.

SOMETHING IN COMMON
Barnes is national secretary of the SWP, Waters is editor of
Intercontinental Press (replacing Hansen) and Jaquith is associate
editor of the weekly Militant. In addition to being leaders of the
SWP, this group are the most hardline defenders of the double-agent
Hansen and the architects of the sordid deal to accept US government
money and halt all claims to the identity of the FBI agents in the
SWP.
These 11 have something else in common. They all attended the same
university - Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.
Barnes andStone entered Carleton in the fall of 1957 and graduated
with the class of 1961. They left the school as husband and wife.
Waters, Styron and Benson belonged to the class of 1963. Jenness and
Eidsvik belonged to the class of 1964. Seigle, Mattson and Lund
belonged to the class of 1966. Jaquith belonged to the class of 1969.
The fact that more than one-third of the SWP Political Committee and
more than a quarter of it s entire national leadership come from the
same exclusive Mid-Western college cannot be passed off as a
coincidence. It is thoroughly suspect and demands the fullest
investigation. To say the least, the SWP's leadership is an example of
political inbreeding without precedent in the history of the socialist
movement. It represents — and this is the best that could be said of
it — an utterly hideous clique formation.
Who are these 11 people? None of them come from a background in any
way connected with the struggles of the American working class. They
arrrived at Carleton University with reputations as 'all-American'
high school boys and girls, not even remotely associated with any form
of protest or radical activity. They impressed their teachers as
community do-gooders, avid scouts and campers, sports enthusiasts and,
in most cases, high-minded participants in church activities.
There might have been an explanation for the incredible influx of
Carleton College graduates into the SWP leadership if the campus was a
hotbed of radical activity in the 1960s or if the SWP ran a
flourishing branch there. But there is not the slightest evidence that
this was the case. On the contrary, the SWP appears to have no history
of activity at Carleton. In that part of the United States, the SWP's
original roots were in the great historic struggles of the Minneapolis
working class. The SWP played a crucial role in the leadership of
Local 544 of the Teamsters starting with the great strike of 1934 and
leading to mass recruitment into the unions across 11 states. Yet
today, the group of 11 from Carleton maintains a stranglehold over the
entire SWP.

CARLETONISATION
In a recent report to the SWP national committee, entitled Forging the
Leadership of the Proletarian Party, Mary-Alice Waters stated:
The membership of the SWP is roughly 42 per cent female, but 33 per
cent of the National Committee is women. On the other hand, 6 or 7 per
cent of party members are black, but 26 per cent of our National
Committee is black. The Latino members make up about 5 per cent of the
party, and about 7 per cent of the National Committee. As of this
plenum, about 39 per cent of the membership, and 30 per cent of the
National Committee are industrial workers.
My own opinion is that the composition of our national committee is
not out of harmony with the real leadership of the party. Give or take
a few percentage points — and that is not important — those figures
fairly accurately reflect what we have accomplished. In that sense,
the National Committee elected at the last convention is good.
Because, as we pointed out at the time, our elected leadership and our
real leadership had better coincide, or else our leading committees
would lose their authority. We would be as phoney as a three dollar
bill if our real leadership and our elected leadership got out of
mesh. ('Discussion Bulletin', Vol.36, No. 13, P-8)
The statistically-minded Ms. Waters might have mentioned the following
interesting set of statistics. The Carleton 11 constitutes
approximately 0.6 per cent of the entire membershp of the Socialist
Workers Party. However, the Carleton groups holds 15.2 per cent of the
seats on the present National Committee. This figure still does not
give the true measure of the control which this group exerts on the
SWP, because the percentages are even higher on the committees which
govern the day-to-day activities of the SWP.
While Ms Waters promotes a thoroughgoing diversion about the
'proletarianisation' of the SWP, the fact is that it has been
'Carletonised'. On the SWP Political Committee, the Carleton group
holds 35.2 per cent of the seats. Following this month's convention at
Oberlin, this figure will rise to 3 7.5 per cent. The control of this
Carleton grou p was strengthened following the last SWP convention in
1977 when the size of the Political Committee was reduced from 24 to
17 members. At the convention taking place now, it will be reduced
further to 16 members.
This reorganisation at the top and centralising of control must be
seen against the background of Hansen's death in January and the
inevitable reshuffling in the network of agents. During the past year,
actions have been taken which place under the control of this Carleton
group every aspect of the SWP's work. During the past few months, the
Political Committee has established an Organisation Committee.
According to Waters, 'The Organisation Commitee handles questions of
personnel, finances, communications with the field; helps to organise
and prepare meetings of the Political Committee; and takes care of as
many of the day-to-day administrative tasks as it can.' (Vol.36, No.
13, p!2) When this Organisation Committee was established, it
consisted of six members. Three of them were Political Committee
members: Doug Jenness, Elizabeth (Betsey) Stone and Larry Seigle —all
from Carleton College! The SWP Political Committee also established an
international subcommittee which directs the activities of the SWP in
the United Secretariat (which it, however, cannot join because of the
reactionary Voorhis Act). This subcommittee which directs all the
international work of the SWP has five members. Three of them are
alumni of Carleton College — Jack Barnes, Doug Jenness and Mary-Alice
Waters.
To complete this picture, let us note again that the position of
national secretary and the editorship of Intercontinental Press are in
the hands of the Carleton alumni Barnes and Waters. And another
crucial assignment — the handling of the SWP's contact with the
Justice Department in negotiations over the settlement of the
Political Rights Defense suit — was placed in the hands of Seigle.
Under his guidance, the SWP has dropped its demand for the exposure of
the agents' files in return for money and has virtually abandoned the
entire law suit.
There is still another statistic which is noted: out of the 11
Carleton students who joined the SWP, all of them became full members
or alternates on the National Committee.
These statistics present an extraordinary picture of an organisation
which is entirely controlled by a group who attended the same
exclusive mid-western college and who share virtually identical middle-
class backgrounds. The running of the SWP is in the hands of a group
who discuss and coordinate their activities among themselves. The
National Committee rubberstamps decisions prepared in advance.
An investigation of these 10 individuals is an urgent necessity. There
may be important agents in the SWP who did not attend Carleton
College. But Jack Barnes and his associates must be considered prime
suspects. It is beyond the realm of probability — either mathematical
or political—that the central leadership of what claims to be a
revolutionary party could emerge out of one small Mid-Western college.
As every Marxist knows, the development of revolutionary leadership is
bound up with the question of 'generations' and the historical and
social experiences through which these generations pass. The impulse
for the development of revolutionary fighters and Marxism is provided
by the class struggle. Reflected in each individual leader are
problems associated with different periods in the class struggle and
various layers within the working class and sections of the middle
class. Leaders come forward in their development not as individuals
but as the expression of social forces in the class struggle. The
pioneers of American Trotskyism emerged out of both the heroic period
of IWW struggles in the United States and the all-powerful impact of
the 1917 October Revolution. The next generation of Trotskyist
leadership in the United States who participated with Cannon in the
building of the SWP emerged out of the great movement of the working
class provoked by the Depression. The highest expression of this
development was the cadre of Minneapolis workers who either
participated in or were influenced by the 1934 General Strike.
After the initial upsurge of the working class following World War II
— during which the membership of the SWP grew rapidly — the problems
of party-building became exceptionally difficult as the post-war
economic 'boom' got underway. The vast majority of the new recruits of
1945-1947 were lost. The growth of McCarthyite reaction only deepened
the isolation of the SWP from the broad masses of the working class.
Within the party itself, a whole section of trade unionists succumbed
to the pressures of the boom, abandoned Trotskyism and deserted the
Fourth International with Pablo in 1953. Towards the end of the 1950s
other factors also intervened to weaken the SWP — the death of John G.
Wright (Usick) and the resignation of Morris Lewitt (Stein) to name
but two.
So great was the impact of the isolation imposed by the boom on the
SWP that its old leadership began to politically retreat and was
completely incapable of taking advantage of the one great opportunity
for recruitment that emerged in the 1950s: that is, the smashing up of
the Communist Party in the shattering of world Stalinism that emerged
out of Khrushchev's secret speech to the 20th Congress in 1956 and the
suppression of the Hungarian Revolution. In the late 1950s, the SWP
embarked on its ill-fated and opportunist 'regroup-ment' policy which
eventually led to the recruitment of a layer of students out of the
Shachtmanite movement. But it was not even from this layer that the
new leadership of the SWP emerged.

CUBAN CONNECTION
The Carleton College group suddenly appeared on the scene like a bolt
from the blue. It had absolutely no identifiable political genealogy.
The Minneapolis branch of the SWP had never undertaken political work
at Carleton College.
The official story advanced by the SWP leadership is that Barnes was
radicalised by the Cuban Revolution. This must have happened very
suddenly, for the conservative governors of the prestigious Ford
Foundation detected nothing politically questionable about Barnes when
they granted him a fellowship to visit Cuba. The president of the
Foundation at the time was Dean Rusk, soon to be chosen as US
Secretary of State and in that office become one of the principle
architects of the imperialist aggression against Vietnam. Barnes was
also awarded the equally prestigious Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.
In fact, the whole story of the shock impact of the Cuban Revolution
on the minds of young Carletonians is thoroughly dubious. Despite the
importance of this struggle, there is absolutely no evidence to
support the claim that the events in Cuba were accompanied by a wave
of radicalisation on the American campuses. There is not another
campus in the United States where the reaction to the Cuban Revolution
produced any significant recruitment into the Troskyist movement. The
Carleton development was not only untypical; it was unique. Moreover,
it becomes entirely inexplicable in politically legitimate terms when
one recalls that the SWP itself virtually ignored the Cuban Revolution
for the first year after Castro's accession to power.
It was Joseph Hansen who first made Cuba the major issue in the
Trotskyist movement in 1961, and that was for the purpose of
engineering, on behalf of the FBI-CIA, a split by the SWP from the
International Committee of the Fourth International. Barnes and the
Carleton College group came into prominence as handraisers for Hansen
against the minority within the SWP who opposed the split from the
International Commmittee. Barnes and his Carleton associates entered
the milieu of the SWP via the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. While
serving as a senior proctor at Carleton, responsible for maintaining
discipline among younger students, Barnes became identified with the
newly-formed Carleton chapter of this Committee. As American
imperialism became increasingly hostile to the Castro regime, the Fair
Play committees became active in different parts of the country. There
is no doubting that the chapters became prime targets for CIA and FBI
infiltration. One can assume that both agencies occasionally set up
chapters on their own in order to improve their access to left-wing
groups. Barnes and his associates were not the only ones who made
their initial contact with the SWP through the Fair Play committees.
An identical path was travelled by Lee Harvey Oswald, the future
assassin of President Kennedy.

BACKGROUND OF AN AGENT
One thing is certain: the emergence of the Carleton College group
coincided with the most intensive period of FBI-CIA infiltration of
the Socialist Workers Party. There exist overwhelming grounds for
suspicion that Barnes and his Carleton associates were recruited into
the FBI or CIA during their years at the College and sent into the
Socialist Workers Party. There, their rapid advancement into the
leadership of the Party was guaranteed by the influence exerted by the
key FBI agent, Joseph Hansen.
The impecccably patriotic middle-class backgrounds of the Carle-ton
group — the sons and daughters of respected small town professionals,
local businessmen and even a missionary — could serve as a stereotype
of thousands of students in the late 1950s and early 1960s who were
attracted by the prospects of an exciting government career in the
CIA. One persuasive recruiting officer for the CIA on a visit to
Carleton College could well have provided the impulse which led ten of
its students into the SWP. Philip Agee provided a very straightforward
picture of how he became a CIA agent, and it certainly applies to many
others:
Hundreds of companies come to the university to interview students for
possible employment. I hadn't signed up for any interviews, but I've
just had my first and probably only, job interview. To my surprise a
man from the CIA came out from Washington to see me about going into a
secret junior executive training program. Virginia Pilgrim must have
recommended me. I'd forgotten she mentioned a program like this when
she stayed with us in Tampa last year — said she would dearly love to
see the son of her oldest friends come into the CIA. . . (Inside the
Company: CIA Diary, Bantam page 1).
What did the CIA like about Agee?
Gus (the recruiter) knew a lot about me: student government, academic
honors and the rest. I said that what I liked best was being chairman
of the Washington's Birthday Exercises in February when we gave the
patriotism award to General Curtis Lemay. (Inside the Company: CIA
Diary, Bantam page 2).
As a social type common found on the Mid-West campuses in the late
1950s and early 1960s, Agee as a student was mirrored in Barnes,
Styron, Benson and Jenness. They all were active in student
government, but perhaps the most outstanding young citizen among them
was Charles Sheridan Styron, whom his friends called 'Dan'. He was the
popular students leader who was elected president of the Carleton
Student Association. In 1963, after he had already become active in
the voung Socialist Alliance, youth movement of the SWP, Styron was
selected to give the student address at the inauguration of the new
President of Carleton College — with whom he remained on intimate
terms even after graduation. In this period, the intellectual climate
on campuses like Carleton was dominated by the vicious
anti-communism and anti-Marxism of the liberal university hierarchy.
Even more interesting about Styron, whose Carleton bride was Mary-
Alice Waters, was his penchant for travel. In 1960, he spent five
weeks of the summer touring the Soviet Union. That period was the very
height of the Cold War. There was no such thing as casual vacationing
in the USSR for Americans. The scheduled Paris summit had just
collapsed following the infamous U-2 incident in which an American spy
plane was shot down over the Soviet Union. But Styron managed to get a
visa and travelled 5,000 miles by car through Minsk, Smolensk, Moscow,
Leningrad, Novgorod, Kharkov and Kiev.
At that time, such a trip could have been made only with the express
authorisation of the American government. And upon return, it would
have been considered virtually mandatory that the individual who made
the trip submit to an exhaustive debriefing conducted by the CIA. As
for Styron's political convictions, they are reflected in a column he
wrote in a campus newspaper on December 6, 1961:
Those who see the total destruction of mankind as a possible
alternative to the 'Red Menace' also make the mistake of attributing
to the dictatorship in the USSR undeserved power. They also show a
complete lack of faith in the power of free institutions to overcome
this totalitarian regime.
When Styron wrote this anti-communist garbage, he and his friend John
Benson were up to their ears in the Fair Play for Cuba Committee
activities. The sentiments expressed in that passage are not those of
a young man turning toward Marxism. It is the language of someone
preening himself for a career in the CIA.
Styron's rise through the ranks of the SWP was meteoric. He soon was a
National Committee member and then a senatorial candidate of the SWP
in California. But in 1976, after more than a decade in the leadership
of the SWP, Styron was suddenly removed from the National Committee
without explanation. This is unusual because Styron is the only member
of the Carleton group that lost a position in the leadership. This
occurred just as the official reports of 1,600 informers having been
active in and around the SWP became frontpage headlines in newspapers
all over the United States.
In April 1979, Styron committed suicide in Houston — where he had been
sent ostensibly to participate in the SWP's 'industrialising' policy.
The explanation for this suicide was Styron's increasingly severe
bouts of depression. For a long-time party leader, Styron received
incredible short shrift — especially from his old classmates from
Carleton College. There was a one page obituary in The Militant - not
written by any of his Carleton associates — a small memorial meeting
in Houston, and that was that. He has not been mentioned since.
It must be considered a strong possibility that Styron's removal from
the national committee was carried out because he stood — for one
reason or another — in special danger of exposure as a police agent.
In the interest of mutual self-preservation, the Carleton group had to
ease Styron out of the political limelight.
This sinister secret faction from Carleton College must be
investigated. The ten surviving members of this faction must be
compelled to come before a Commission of Inquiry and answer detailed
questions about their background that is put before them. If their
reputations are clear, they should have no objections.
Responsible members of the SWP must insist at this Convention now in
session at Oberlin that the entire Carleton group be removed from all
offices and positions on the National Committee until the
investigation is completed and if they are cleared.
The International Committee is now gathering further evidence on this
Carleton group that it will submit to a proper and duly constituted
Commission of Inquiry, as has already been set forth in Security and
the Fourth International.
First published in The News Line, August 7, 1979
Vngelis
2012-01-07 16:26:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by dusty
Funny how you don't hear or see much about this today from either of
the two extant "IC" fragments, even though both (the "SEP" and "WRP")
still uphold it and the "SWP" is still active and, I note, includes in
its leadership figures, several of those named in the document below.
Maybe as they are now in the NWO Globalist Left they have - to coin an
appropriate metaphor - "buried the hatchet"...
Now read on...
International Committee of the Fourth International
FBI SPIES IN THE SWP (USA)
The strange group from Carleton College, Minnesota
LABOUR REVIEW Vol. III No 3
pp. 139 - 149
When Joseph Hansen died on January 17, 1979, he left behind a network
of secret police agents in the leadership of his revisionist Socialist
Workers Party (USA). This group of agents constitutes a tremendous
danger to the Fourth International, the international working class
and the oppressed masses. They function not only as domestic
stoolpigeons within the American labour movement, but as the
organisers and instigators of provocations against revolutionary
movements all over the world.
The centre of this conspiracy is the weekly magazine,
'Intercontinental Press', which was founded by Joseph Hansen and is
published in the national headquarters of the SWP in New York City. It
is the nerve centre of an international network of skilled and
ruthless police spies such as FAUSTO AMADOR, the agent of ex-dictator
Somoza, who was billed by 'Intercontinental Press' as 'a leading Latin
American Trotskyist (November 27, 1977).
The agents inside the leadership of the SWP enjoy unlimited backing
from the US government. A Federal court order that the files of some
of these agents be released was first defied by the US Attorney
General and then overturned by a higher court. The government is now
seeking legislation that would impose a seven-year moratorium on the
exposure of informants' files under the Freedom of Information Act.
Simultaneously, the SWP has decided to drop its suit to uncover the
names of hundreds of agents within its 'top offices' and membership in
exchange for a cash settlement with the government.
The International Committee of the Fourth International is determined
to expose the present functioning agents in the SWP -just as the late
Joseph Hansen was exposed. Who are they, how were they recruited, who
trained them, where did they come from?
In recent weeks the four-year investigation into 'Security and the
Fourth International' has entered a completely new field of research.
It has temporarily left the skyscraper metropolis of New York City,
the steamy suburbs of Mexico City, the grey granite US National
Archives Building in Washington, DC, and the pre-war record centres of
Western Europe. The investigation has travelled lo the Mid-west of the
United States to the small, sleepy rural town of Northfield in the
state of Minnesota. The pride of the upper middle class who live there
is Carleton College, an elite private university set in idyllic
surroundings of vast lawns, gardens and playing fields.
While the other numerous state colleges have few restrictions on
admissions, low tuition fees and a large intake of working-class
youth, Carleton is a strictly exclusive institution. It is expensive,
its students are creamed from 'the best and brightest' and it
specialises in the 'liberal arts'. Applicants are primarily from
bourgeois and well-off families who want their sons and daughters to
'get on in life' and to make the right connections. Each potential
student is obliged to submit an autobiographical essay with his or her
application form. These are studied by a staff of admission officers
who are skilled at spotting those who can be trusted to uphold 'the
American way' and weeding out the 'undesirables'.
Carleton's Board of Trustees consists largely of the most reactionary
industrialists and bankers in the United States. During the 1950s and
early 1960s, the President of Carleton College was Lawrence Gould, an
explorer and admirer of the World Federalist schemes championed by the
dean of CIA agents, Cord Meyer Jr. The official philosophy at Carleton
during their period was based on a fervent anti-communist liberalism.
It preached on behalf of 'responsible' free enterprise against the
'horrors of totalitarian collectivism'. As the conservatism of the
Eisenhower years gave way to the crusading anti-communism of the
Kennedy administration, it was common for students from the middle
class to enrol in government service -anything from the so-called
'Peace Corps' to the CIA — in order to prosecute the 'war against
communism'. Carleton College was no exception.
Our attention is now concentrated on a group of 11 people in the
leadership of the SWP: Jack Barnes, Mary-Alice Waters, Elisabeth
Stone, John Benson, Doug Jenness, Caroline Lund, Larry Settle, Barbara
Mattson, Cindy Jaquith, Dan Styron and Paul Eidsvik. All these
individuals — with the sole exception of Eidsvik — have served as
members of the SWP Political Committeee, National Committee, or as
alternates. Six of them are presently members of the Political
Committee: Barnes, Waters, Stone, Jenness, Seigle and Jaquith. They
have all been re-nominated to serve again on a revised Political
Committee of 16 which is to be elected at the SWP convention at
Oberlin, Ohio, this month.
SOMETHING IN COMMON
Barnes is national secretary of the SWP, Waters is editor of
Intercontinental Press (replacing Hansen) and Jaquith is associate
editor of the weekly Militant. In addition to being leaders of the
SWP, this group are the most hardline defenders of the double-agent
Hansen and the architects of the sordid deal to accept US government
money and halt all claims to the identity of the FBI agents in the
SWP.
These 11 have something else in common. They all attended the same
university - Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.
Barnes andStone entered Carleton in the fall of 1957 and graduated
with the class of 1961. They left the school as husband and wife.
Waters, Styron and Benson belonged to the class of 1963. Jenness and
Eidsvik belonged to the class of 1964. Seigle, Mattson and Lund
belonged to the class of 1966. Jaquith belonged to the class of 1969.
The fact that more than one-third of the SWP Political Committee and
more than a quarter of it s entire national leadership come from the
same exclusive Mid-Western college cannot be passed off as a
coincidence. It is thoroughly suspect and demands the fullest
investigation. To say the least, the SWP's leadership is an example of
political inbreeding without precedent in the history of the socialist
movement. It represents — and this is the best that could be said of
it — an utterly hideous clique formation.
Who are these 11 people? None of them come from a background in any
way connected with the struggles of the American working class. They
arrrived at Carleton University with reputations as 'all-American'
high school boys and girls, not even remotely associated with any form
of protest or radical activity. They impressed their teachers as
community do-gooders, avid scouts and campers, sports enthusiasts and,
in most cases, high-minded participants in church activities.
There might have been an explanation for the incredible influx of
Carleton College graduates into the SWP leadership if the campus was a
hotbed of radical activity in the 1960s or if the SWP ran a
flourishing branch there. But there is not the slightest evidence that
this was the case. On the contrary, the SWP appears to have no history
of activity at Carleton. In that part of the United States, the SWP's
original roots were in the great historic struggles of the Minneapolis
working class. The SWP played a crucial role in the leadership of
Local 544 of the Teamsters starting with the great strike of 1934 and
leading to mass recruitment into the unions across 11 states. Yet
today, the group of 11 from Carleton maintains a stranglehold over the
entire SWP.
CARLETONISATION
In a recent report to the SWP national committee, entitled Forging the
The membership of the SWP is roughly 42 per cent female, but 33 per
cent of the National Committee is women. On the other hand, 6 or 7 per
cent of party members are black, but 26 per cent of our National
Committee is black. The Latino members make up about 5 per cent of the
party, and about 7 per cent of the National Committee. As of this
plenum, about 39 per cent of the membership, and 30 per cent of the
National Committee are industrial workers.
My own opinion is that the composition of our national committee is
not out of harmony with the real leadership of the party. Give or take
a few percentage points — and that is not important — those figures
fairly accurately reflect what we have accomplished. In that sense,
the National Committee elected at the last convention is good.
Because, as we pointed out at the time, our elected leadership and our
real leadership had better coincide, or else our leading committees
would lose their authority. We would be as phoney as a three dollar
bill if our real leadership and our elected leadership got out of
mesh. ('Discussion Bulletin', Vol.36, No. 13, P-8)
The statistically-minded Ms. Waters might have mentioned the following
interesting set of statistics. The Carleton 11 constitutes
approximately 0.6 per cent of the entire membershp of the Socialist
Workers Party. However, the Carleton groups holds 15.2 per cent of the
seats on the present National Committee. This figure still does not
give the true measure of the control which this group exerts on the
SWP, because the percentages are even higher on the committees which
govern the day-to-day activities of the SWP.
While Ms Waters promotes a thoroughgoing diversion about the
'proletarianisation' of the SWP, the fact is that it has been
'Carletonised'. On the SWP Political Committee, the Carleton group
holds 35.2 per cent of the seats. Following this month's convention at
Oberlin, this figure will rise to 3 7.5 per cent. The control of this
Carleton grou p was strengthened following the last SWP convention in
1977 when the size of the Political Committee was reduced from 24 to
17 members. At the convention taking place now, it will be reduced
further to 16 members.
This reorganisation at the top and centralising of control must be
seen against the background of Hansen's death in January and the
inevitable reshuffling in the network of agents. During the past year,
actions have been taken which place under the control of this Carleton
group every aspect of the SWP's work. During the past few months, the
Political Committee has established an Organisation Committee.
According to Waters, 'The Organisation Commitee handles questions of
personnel, finances, communications with the field; helps to organise
and prepare meetings of the Political Committee; and takes care of as
many of the day-to-day administrative tasks as it can.' (Vol.36, No.
13, p!2) When this Organisation Committee was established, it
consisted of six members. Three of them were Political Committee
members: Doug Jenness, Elizabeth (Betsey) Stone and Larry Seigle —all
from Carleton College! The SWP Political Committee also established an
international subcommittee which directs the activities of the SWP in
the United Secretariat (which it, however, cannot join because of the
reactionary Voorhis Act). This subcommittee which directs all the
international work of the SWP has five members. Three of them are
alumni of Carleton College — Jack Barnes, Doug Jenness and Mary-Alice
Waters.
To complete this picture, let us note again that the position of
national secretary and the editorship of Intercontinental Press are in
the hands of the Carleton alumni Barnes and Waters. And another
crucial assignment — the handling of the SWP's contact with the
Justice Department in negotiations over the settlement of the
Political Rights Defense suit — was placed in the hands of Seigle.
Under his guidance, the SWP has dropped its demand for the exposure of
the agents' files in return for money and has virtually abandoned the
entire law suit.
There is still another statistic which is noted: out of the 11
Carleton students who joined the SWP, all of them became full members
or alternates on the National Committee.
These statistics present an extraordinary picture of an organisation
which is entirely controlled by a group who attended the same
exclusive mid-western college and who share virtually identical middle-
class backgrounds. The running of the SWP is in the hands of a group
who discuss and coordinate their activities among themselves. The
National Committee rubberstamps decisions prepared in advance.
An investigation of these 10 individuals is an urgent necessity. There
may be important agents in the SWP who did not attend Carleton
College. But Jack Barnes and his associates must be considered prime
suspects. It is beyond the realm of probability — either mathematical
or political—that the central leadership of what claims to be a
revolutionary party could emerge out of one small Mid-Western college.
As every Marxist knows, the development of revolutionary leadership is
bound up with the question of 'generations' and the historical and
social experiences through which these generations pass. The impulse
for the development of revolutionary fighters and Marxism is provided
by the class struggle. Reflected in each individual leader are
problems associated with different periods in the class struggle and
various layers within the working class and sections of the middle
class. Leaders come forward in their development not as individuals
but as the expression of social forces in the class struggle. The
pioneers of American Trotskyism emerged out of both the heroic period
of IWW struggles in the United States and the all-powerful impact of
the 1917 October Revolution. The next generation of Trotskyist
leadership in the United States who participated with Cannon in the
building of the SWP emerged out of the great movement of the working
class provoked by the Depression. The highest expression of this
development was the cadre of Minneapolis workers who either
participated in or were influenced by the 1934 General Strike.
After the initial upsurge of the working class following World War II
— during which the membership of the SWP grew rapidly — the problems
of party-building became exceptionally difficult as the post-war
economic 'boom' got underway. The vast majority of the new recruits of
1945-1947 were lost. The growth of McCarthyite reaction only deepened
the isolation of the SWP from the broad masses of the working class.
Within the party itself, a whole section of trade unionists succumbed
to the pressures of the boom, abandoned Trotskyism and deserted the
Fourth International with Pablo in 1953. Towards the end of the 1950s
other factors also intervened to weaken the SWP — the death of John G.
Wright (Usick) and the resignation of Morris Lewitt (Stein) to name
but two.
So great was the impact of the isolation imposed by the boom on the
SWP that its old leadership began to politically retreat and was
completely incapable of taking advantage of the one great opportunity
for recruitment that emerged in the 1950s: that is, the smashing up of
the Communist Party in the shattering of world Stalinism that emerged
out of Khrushchev's secret speech to the 20th Congress in 1956 and the
suppression of the Hungarian Revolution. In the late 1950s, the SWP
embarked on its ill-fated and opportunist 'regroup-ment' policy which
eventually led to the recruitment of a layer of students out of the
Shachtmanite movement. But it was not even from this layer that the
new leadership of the SWP emerged.
CUBAN CONNECTION
The Carleton College group suddenly appeared on the scene like a bolt
from the blue. It had absolutely no identifiable political genealogy.
The Minneapolis branch of the SWP had never undertaken political work
at Carleton College.
The official story advanced by the SWP leadership is that Barnes was
radicalised by the Cuban Revolution. This must have happened very
suddenly, for the conservative governors of the prestigious Ford
Foundation detected nothing politically questionable about Barnes when
they granted him a fellowship to visit Cuba. The president of the
Foundation at the time was Dean Rusk, soon to be chosen as US
Secretary of State and in that office become one of the principle
architects of the imperialist aggression against Vietnam. Barnes was
also awarded the equally prestigious Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.
In fact, the whole story of the shock impact of the Cuban Revolution
on the minds of young Carletonians is thoroughly dubious. Despite the
importance of this struggle, there is absolutely no evidence to
support the claim that the events in Cuba were accompanied by a wave
of radicalisation on the American campuses. There is not another
campus in the United States where the reaction to the Cuban Revolution
produced any significant recruitment into the Troskyist movement. The
Carleton development was not only untypical; it was unique. Moreover,
it becomes entirely inexplicable in politically legitimate terms when
one recalls that the SWP itself virtually ignored the Cuban Revolution
for the first year after Castro's accession to power.
It was Joseph Hansen who first made Cuba the major issue in the
Trotskyist movement in 1961, and that was for the purpose of
engineering, on behalf of the FBI-CIA, a split by the SWP from the
International Committee of the Fourth International. Barnes and the
Carleton College group came into prominence as handraisers for Hansen
against the minority within the SWP who opposed the split from the
International Commmittee. Barnes and his Carleton associates entered
the milieu of the SWP via the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. While
serving as a senior proctor at Carleton, responsible for maintaining
discipline among younger students, Barnes became identified with the
newly-formed Carleton chapter of this Committee. As American
imperialism became increasingly hostile to the Castro regime, the Fair
Play committees became active in different parts of the country. There
is no doubting that the chapters became prime targets for CIA and FBI
infiltration. One can assume that both agencies occasionally set up
chapters on their own in order to improve their access to left-wing
groups. Barnes and his associates were not the only ones who made
their initial contact with the SWP through the Fair Play committees.
An identical path was travelled by Lee Harvey Oswald, the future
assassin of President Kennedy.
BACKGROUND OF AN AGENT
One thing is certain: the emergence of the Carleton College group
coincided with the most intensive period of FBI-CIA infiltration of
the Socialist Workers Party. There exist overwhelming grounds for
suspicion that Barnes and his Carleton associates were recruited into
the FBI or CIA during their years at the College and sent into the
Socialist Workers Party. There, their rapid advancement into the
leadership of the Party was guaranteed by the influence exerted by the
key FBI agent, Joseph Hansen.
The impecccably patriotic middle-class backgrounds of the Carle-ton
group — the sons and daughters of respected small town professionals,
local businessmen and even a missionary — could serve as a stereotype
of thousands of students in the late 1950s and early 1960s who were
attracted by the prospects of an exciting government career in the
CIA. One persuasive recruiting officer for the CIA on a visit to
Carleton College could well have provided the impulse which led ten of
its students into the SWP. Philip Agee provided a very straightforward
picture of how he became a CIA agent, and it certainly applies to many
Hundreds of companies come to the university to interview students for
possible employment. I hadn't signed up for any interviews, but I've
just had my first and probably only, job interview. To my surprise a
man from the CIA came out from Washington to see me about going into a
secret junior executive training program. Virginia Pilgrim must have
recommended me. I'd forgotten she mentioned a program like this when
she stayed with us in Tampa last year — said she would dearly love to
see the son of her oldest friends come into the CIA. . . (Inside the
Company: CIA Diary, Bantam page 1).
What did the CIA like about Agee?
Gus (the recruiter) knew a lot about me: student government, academic
honors and the rest. I said that what I liked best was being chairman
of the Washington's Birthday Exercises in February when we gave the
patriotism award to General Curtis Lemay. (Inside the Company: CIA
Diary, Bantam page 2).
As a social type common found on the Mid-West campuses in the late
1950s and early 1960s, Agee as a student was mirrored in Barnes,
Styron, Benson and Jenness. They all were active in student
government, but perhaps the most outstanding young citizen among them
was Charles Sheridan Styron, whom his friends called 'Dan'. He was the
popular students leader who was elected president of the Carleton
Student Association. In 1963, after he had already become active in
the voung Socialist Alliance, youth movement of the SWP, Styron was
selected to give the student address at the inauguration of the new
President of Carleton College — with whom he remained on intimate
terms even after graduation. In this period, the intellectual climate
on campuses   like   Carleton   was   dominated   by   the   vicious
anti-communism and anti-Marxism of the liberal university hierarchy.
Even more interesting about Styron, whose Carleton bride was Mary-
Alice Waters, was his penchant for travel. In 1960, he spent five
weeks of the summer touring the Soviet Union. That period was the very
height of the Cold War. There was no such thing as casual vacationing
in the USSR for Americans. The scheduled Paris summit had just
collapsed following the infamous U-2 incident in which an American spy
plane was shot down over the Soviet Union. But Styron managed to get a
visa and travelled 5,000 miles by car through Minsk, Smolensk, Moscow,
Leningrad, Novgorod, Kharkov and Kiev.
At that time, such a trip could have been made only with the express
authorisation of the American government. And upon return, it would
have been considered virtually mandatory that the individual who made
the trip submit to an exhaustive debriefing conducted by the CIA. As
for Styron's political convictions, they are reflected in a column he
Those who see the total destruction of mankind as a possible
alternative to the 'Red Menace' also make the mistake of attributing
to the dictatorship in the USSR undeserved power. They also show a
complete lack of faith in the power of free institutions to overcome
this totalitarian regime.
When Styron wrote this anti-communist garbage, he and his friend John
Benson were up to their ears in the Fair Play for Cuba Committee
activities. The sentiments expressed in that passage are not those of
a young man turning toward Marxism. It is the language of someone
preening himself for a career in the CIA.
Styron's rise through the ranks of the SWP was meteoric. He soon was a
National Committee member and then a senatorial candidate of the SWP
in California. But in 1976, after more than a decade in the leadership
of the SWP, Styron was suddenly removed from the National Committee
without explanation. This is unusual because Styron is the only member
of the Carleton group that lost a position in the leadership. This
occurred just as the official reports of 1,600 informers having been
active in and around the SWP became frontpage headlines in newspapers
all over the United States.
In April 1979, Styron committed suicide in Houston — where he had been
sent ostensibly to participate in the SWP's 'industrialising' policy.
The explanation for this suicide was Styron's increasingly severe
bouts of depression. For a long-time party leader, Styron received
incredible short shrift — especially from his old classmates from
Carleton College. There was a one page obituary in The Militant - not
written by any of his Carleton associates — a small memorial meeting
in Houston, and that was that. He has not been mentioned since.
It must be considered a strong possibility that Styron's removal from
the national committee was carried out because he stood — for one
reason or another — in special danger of exposure as a police agent.
In the interest of mutual self-preservation, the Carleton group had to
ease Styron out of the political limelight.
This sinister secret faction from Carleton College must be
investigated. The ten surviving members of this faction must be
compelled to come before a Commission of Inquiry and answer detailed
questions about their background that is put before them. If their
reputations are clear, they should have no objections.
Responsible members of the SWP must insist at this Convention now in
session at Oberlin that the entire Carleton group be removed from all
offices and positions on the National Committee until the
investigation is completed and if they are cleared.
The International Committee is now gathering further evidence on this
Carleton group that it will submit to a proper and duly constituted
Commission of Inquiry, as has already been set forth in Security and
the Fourth International.
First published in The News Line, August 7, 1979
This garbage was produced to keep the IC intact after the splits in
the British, Greek, US sections.

All garbage.

vngelis
dusty
2012-01-07 17:06:31 UTC
Permalink
On Jan 8, 3:26 am, Vngelis <***@hotmail.com> wrote:

This garbage was produced to keep the IC intact after the splits in
the British, Greek, US sections.

All garbage.

vngelis


Well the shit was thrown around far and wide and not a small amount of
it hit close to home as well.

Much of it was garbage, though I have trouble explaining the Carleton
College clot...for just some of the reasons presented in the article.

My main point is that the 'WRP' NEVER talk of this cause celebre today
as though they are shy to do so. Nor the "SEP". Yet both of them have
NEVER disavowed ANY of it.

Nor has Ms Redgrave and the "WRP" ever explained and elaborated on the
claims about the Agent induced break up of the WRP in 1986.
dusty
2012-01-10 03:09:55 UTC
Permalink
“Carleton's Board of Trustees consists largely of the most reactionary
industrialists and bankers in the United States. During the 1950s and
early 1960s, the President of Carleton College was Lawrence Gould, an
explorer and admirer of the World Federalist schemes championed by the
dean of CIA agents, Cord Meyer Jr. The official philosophy at Carleton
during their period was based on a fervent anti-communist liberalism.
It preached on behalf of 'responsible' free enterprise against the
'horrors of totalitarian collectivism'. As the conservatism of the
Eisenhower years gave way to the crusading anti-communism of the
Kennedy administration, it was common for students from the middle
class to enrol in government service -anything from the so-called
'Peace Corps' to the CIA — in order to prosecute the 'war against
communism'. Carleton College was no exception.”

Aha…

Collateral enlightenment!

Some interesting insights into the - more recent - origins of World
Government schemas.


Beyond, and connected with that, are so many aspects of the Cord Meyer
connection, which, though not at all developed in the WRP piece, are
of obvious importance ( e.g.: "The IOD was dedicated to infiltrating
academic, trade and political associations."). Given the fact that
Meyer was a "master of Nixonian dirty tricks", lends enormous
credibilty to the central claim of the "IC" re the 'Carlton College
Group' and perhaps, by implication, the pre-existing SWP which 'took
them in'.

Another is the amalgam between different establishment figures and
ethnicities, in and around the CIA...

And there's more too, including 'in-house rubouts', for further
comment and analysis...


http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKmeyerC.htm


Cord Meyer, the son of a senior diplomat, was born on 10th November,
1920. The Meyer family was extremely wealthy and had made its money
from sugar in Cuba and from property on Long Island.
The family settled in New York City . Cord and his twin brother,
Quintin, attended private school in Switzerland and then St. Paul’s
preparatory school in New Hampshire. In 1939 Meyer went to Yale
University to study literature and philosophy. After graduating in
1942 he joined the US Marines.
Meyer was sent to the South Pacific and wrote articles about his
experiences for The Atlantic Monthly. Meyer was a machine-gun platoon
leader and took part in the assault on Guam. He later wrote: “As we
buried our dead I swore to myself that if it was within my power I
should see to it that these deaths would not be forgotten or valued
lightly. No matter how small a contribution I should happen to make it
would be in the right direction.”

On 21st July, 1944, a Japanese grenade was thrown into his foxhole. He
was so badly injured that when he was found he was initially declared
to be dead. In fact, his commanding officer sent a telegram to his
parents announcing he had died. Although he lost his left eye he was
eventually well enough to be sent home. Soon afterwards his twin
brother, Quentin, was killed at Okinawa.

While recovered in New York City Meyer met the journalist, Mary
Pinchot. The couple married on 19th April, 1945. The couple then went
to San Francisco to attend the conference that established the United
Nations. Cord went as an aide to Harold Stassen, whereas Mary, who was
working for the North American Newspaper Alliance at the time, was one
of the reporters sent to cover this important event.


Mary and Cord Meyer on their wedding day (1945)
Meyer told te New York Times that although the United Nations was a
step in the right direction “that the veto power was just another
alliance of the great powers and one that would surely lead to another
war.” Cord proposed that the UN be granted authority to oversee
nuclear power installations inside member countries. He also argued
that the UN should be given the authority to prevent war and “the
armed power to back it up.”
While at the San Francisco Conference he met John F. Kennedy for the
first time. They disagreed about the merits of the United Nations.
Kennedy was far more hopeful of its long-term success and disliked
Meyer’s ideas on world government. Meyer also objected to Kennedy’s
relationship with his new wife.
Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima
and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz
called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the
definitive statement about the dangers of the atomic age. Cord wrote
at the time: “Talked with Mary of how steadily depressing is our full
realization of how little hope there is of avoiding the approaching
catastrophe of atomic warfare.”
The following year he published a book about his war experiences,
Waves of Darkness. Meyer expressed his pacifist views in the book:
“The only certain fruit of this insanity will be the rotting bodies
upon which the sun will impartially shine tomorrow. Let us throw down
these guns that we hate.”

Meyer became an advocate of world government. In May, 1947, Cord Meyer
was elected president of the United World Federalists. Under his
leadership, membership of the organization doubled in size. Albert
Einstein was one of his most important supporters and personally
solicited funds for the organization. Mary Meyer was also active in
the organization and wrote for its journal, The United World
Federalists.

In 1949 Meyer and his family moved to Cambridge. He was showing signs
of becoming disillusioned with the idea of world government. He had
experienced problems with members of the American Communist Party who
had infiltrated the organizations he had established. It was about
this time that he began working secretly for the Central Intelligence
Agency.
In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with
Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of
this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative
Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the
Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against
Imperialism. It is almost certain that this had been done on behalf of
the CIA.

Allen W. Dulles made contact with Cord Meyer in 1951. He accepted the
invitation to join the CIA. Dulles told Meyer he wanted him to work on
a project that was so secret that he could not be told about it until
he officially joined the organization. Meyer was to work under Frank
Wisner, director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This
became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the CIA.
Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on
“propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including
sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures;
subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground
resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements
in threatened countries of the free world.”

Meyer became part of what became known as Operation Mockingbird, a CIA
program to influence the American media. According to Deborah Davis
(Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer
was Mockingbird’s “principal operative”.

One of the most important journalists under the control of Operation
Mockingbird was Joseph Alsop, whose articles appeared in over 300
different newspapers. Other journalists willing to promote the views
of the Central Intelligence Agency included Stewart Alsop (New York
Herald Tribune), Ben Bradlee (Newsweek), James Reston (New York
Times), Charles Douglas Jackson (Time Magazine), Walter Pincus
(Washington Post), William C. Baggs (Miami News), Herb Gold (Miami
News) and Charles Bartlett (Chattanooga Times). These journalists
sometimes wrote articles that were unofficially commissioned by Meyer
was based on leaked classified information from the CIA.

Mary and the family now moved to Washington where they became members
of the Georgetown Crowd. This group included Frank Wisner, George
Kennan, Dean Acheson, Thomas Braden, Richard Bissell, Desmond
FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine
Graham, David Bruce, James Reston, James Truitt, Alfred Friendly,
Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul
Nitze. The Meyers also socialized with other CIA officers or CIA
assets including James Angleton (Cicely Angleton), Wistar Janney (Mary
Wisnar), Ben Bradlee (Antoinette Bradlee) and James Truitt (Anne
Truitt).

Meyer worked under Thomas Braden, the head of International
Organizations Division (IOD). This Central Intelligence Agency unit
helped established anti-Communist front groups in Western Europe.The
IOD was dedicated to infiltrating academic, trade and political
associations. The objective was to control potential radicals and to
steer them to the right.
Meyer oversaw the funding of groups such as the National Student
Association, the Congress of Cultural Freedom, Communications Workers
of America, the American Newspaper Guild and the National Educational
Association. He also provided the money for publishing the journal,
Encounter. Meyer also worked closely with anti-Communist leaders of
the trade union movement such as George Meany of the Congress for
Industrial Organization and the American Federation of Labor.

In 1953 Frank Wisner and the CIA began having trouble with J. Edgar
Hoover. He described the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC) as
“Wisner’s gang of weirdos” and began carrying out investigations into
their past. It did not take him long to discover that some of them had
been active in left-wing politics in the 1930s. This information was
passed to Joseph McCarthy who started making attacks on members of the
OPC. Hoover also passed to McCarthy details of an affair that Wisner
had with Princess Caradja in Romania during the war. Hoover, claimed
that Caradja was a Soviet agent.
J
oseph McCarthy also began accusing other members of the Georgetown
Crowd as being security risks. McCarthy claimed that the CIA was a
“sinkhole of communists” and claimed he intended to root out a hundred
of them. His first targets were Chip Bohlen and Charles Thayer. Bohlen
survived but Thayer was forced to resign.
In August, 1953, Richard Helms, Wisner’s deputy at the OPC, told Meyer
that Joseph McCarthy had accused him of being a communist. The Federal
Bureau of Investigation added to the smear by announcing it was
unwilling to give Meyer “security clearance”. However, the FBI refused
to explain what evidence they had against Meyer. Allen W. Dulles and
both came to his defence and refused to permit a FBI interrogation of
Meyer.

The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he
was a member of several liberal groups considered to be subversive by
the Justice Department. This included being a member of the National
Council on the Arts, where he associated with Norman Thomas, the
leader of the Socialist Party and its presidential candidate in 1948.
It was also pointed out that his wife, Mary Meyer, was a former member
of the American Labor Party. Meyer was eventually cleared of these
charges and was allowed to keep his job.
J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph McCarthy did not realise what they were
taking on. Wisner unleashed Operation Mockingbird on McCarthy. Drew
Pearson, Joe Alsop, Jack Anderson, Walter Lippmann and Ed Murrow all
went into attack mode and McCarthy was permanently damaged by the
press coverage orchestrated by Wisner.
Meyer became disillusioned with life in the CIA and in January, 1954,
he went to New York City and attempted to get a job in publishing.
Although he saw contacts he had made during his covert work with the
media (Operation Mockingbird) he was unable to obtain a job with any
of the established book publishing firms.

In the summer of 1954 the Meyer family’s golden retriever was hit by a
car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. The dog’s
death worried Cord. He told colleagues at the CIA he was afraid the
same thing might happen to one of his children.
In the summer of 1954 the Meyers got new neighbours. John F. Kennedy
and his wife Jackie Kennedy purchased Hickory Hill, a house several
hundred yards from where the Meyers lived. Mary became good friends
with Jackie and they went on walks together.

In November, 1954, Meyer replaced Thomas Braden as head of
International Organizations Division. Meyer began spending a lot of
time in Europe. One of Meyer’s tasks was to supervise Radio Free
Europe and Radio Liberty, the United States government broadcasts to
Eastern Europe. According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman)
Meyer was “overseeing a vast ‘black’ budget of millions of dollars
channeled through phony foundation of a global network of associations
and labor groups that on their surface appeared to be progressive”.
On 18th December, 1956, Cord’s nine-year-old son, Michael, was hit by
a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. It was the
same spot where the family’s golden retriever had been killed two
years earlier. The tragedy briefly brought the couple together.
However, in 1958, Mary filed for divorce. In her divorce petition she
alleged “extreme cruelty, mental in nature, which seriously injured
her health, destroyed her happiness, rendered further cohabitation
unendurable and compelled the parties to separate.”

Meyer’s career continued to prosper and was now high enough in the CIA
hierarchy to be involved in covert operations. This included working
with people like Richard Bissell, Frank Wisner, Tracy Barnes, Jake
Esterline, David Atlee Phillips, William (Rip) Robertson and E. Howard
Hunt. Bissell, who was now head of the OPC, described Meyer as the
“creative genius behind covert operations”.

As chief of the CIA’s International Organizations Division, Meyer met
with President John F. Kennedy and his staff. On 18th October, 1961,
Kennedy consulted Meyer about the possibility of replacing Allen W.
Dulles with John McCone. In his journal he reported that Kennedy was
“much more serious and less arrogant than I’d known him before.” He
added that Kennedy “still yearns for a respect that eludes him from
such as myself.”
It is assumed that Cord was involved in the plot to assassinate Fidel
Castro but so far no documents have been released to confirm this.
Cord also met Robert Kennedy several times after the failed Bay of
Pigs operation.

In 1961 James Jesus Angleton asked Ben Bradlee to suggest to John F.
Kennedy that Meyer should become ambassador to Guatemala. Bradlee, who
disliked Meyer, refused. Bradlee later claimed that he did not respond
to this request because he knew that Kennedy would reject the idea.
Meyer also asked Charles L. Bartlett, another journalist friend of
Kennedy to suggest he should be given a political appointment.
Bartlett did as requested but reported back that “due to some incident
that occured at the U.N. conference in San Francisco in 1945 there was
no possibility”.

On 12th October, 1964, Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead as she walked
along the Chesapeake and Ohio towpath in Georgetown. Henry Wiggins, a
car mechanic, was working on a vehicle on Canal Road, when he heard a
woman shout out: “Someone help me, someone help me”. He then heard two
gunshots. Wiggins ran to the edge of the wall overlooking the towpath.
He later told police he saw “a black man in a light jacket, dark
slacks, and a dark cap standing over the body of a white woman.”
Soon afterwards Raymond Crump, a black man, was found not far from the
murder scene. He was arrested and charged with Mary’s murder. The
towpath and the river were searched but no murder weapon was ever
found.


The murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer
The media did not report at the time that Meyer had been having an
affair with John F. Kennedy. Nor did it reveal that her former husband
was a senior figure in CIA’s covert operations. As a result, there was
little public interest in the case.

During the trial Wiggins was unable to identify Raymond Crump as the
man standing over Meyer’s body. The prosecution was also handicapped
by the fact that the police had been unable to find the murder weapon
at the scene of the crime. On 29th July, 1965, Crump was acquitted of
murdering Mary Meyer. The case remains unsolved.
At the end of 1966 Desmond FitzGerald, head of the Directorate for
Plans, discovered that Ramparts, a left-wing publication, had
discovered that the CIA had been secretly funding the National Student
Association. FitzGerald ordered Edgar Applewhite to organize a
campaign against the magazine. Applewhite later told Evan Thomas for
his book, The Very Best Men: “I had all sorts of dirty tricks to hurt
their circulation and financing. The people running Ramparts were
vulnerable to blackmail. We had awful things in mind, some of which we
carried off.”
This dirty tricks campaign failed to stop Ramparts publishing in
March, 1967. The article, written by Sol Stern, was entitled NSA and
the CIA. As well as reporting CIA funding of the National Student
Association it exposed the whole system of anti-Communist front
organizations in Europe, Asia, and South America. It named Meyer as a
key figure in this campaign. This included the funding of the literary
journal Encounter.

In May 1967 Thomas Braden responded to this by publishing an article
entitled, I’m Glad the CIA is Immoral, in the Saturday Evening Post,
where he defended the activities of the International Organizations
Division unit of the CIA.
In 1967 Meyer became assistant deputy director of plans, a post in
which he worked with spymaster Thomas H. Karamessines. However, the
publicity brought about by the Ramparts revealations did not help his
career.

Meyer role in Operation Mockingbird was further exposed in 1972 when
he was accused of interfering with the publication of a book, The
Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asia by Alfred W. McCoy. The book was
highly critical of the CIA’s dealings with the drug traffic in
Southeast Asia. The publisher, who leaked the story, had been a former
colleague of Meyer’s when he was a liberal activist after the war.

During the Watergate Scandal President Richard Nixon became concerned
about the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency. Three of
those involved in the burglary, E. Howard Hunt, Eugenio Martinez and
James W. McCord had close links with the CIA. Nixon and his aides
attempted to force the CIA director, Richard Helms, and his deputy,
Vernon Walters, to pay hush-money to Hunt, who was attempting to
blackmail the government. Although it seemed Walters was willing to do
this, Helms refused. In February, 1973, Nixon sacked Helms. His
deputy, Thomas H. Karamessines, resigned in protest.

James Schlesinger now became the new director of the CIA. Schlesinger
was heard to say: “The clandestine service was Helms’s Praetorian
Guard. It had too much influence in the Agency and was too powerful
within the government. I am going to cut it down to size.” This he did
and over the next three months over 7 per cent of CIA officers lost
their jobs.
On 9th May, 1973, Schlesinger issued a directive to all CIA employees:
“I have ordered all senior operating officials of this Agency to
report to me immediately on any activities now going on, or might have
gone on in the past, which might be considered to be outside the
legislative charter of this Agency. I hereby direct every person
presently employed by CIA to report to me on any such activities of
which he has knowledge. I invite all ex-employees to do the same.
Anyone who has such information should call my secretary and say that
he wishes to talk to me about “activities outside the CIA’s charter”.

There were several employees who had been trying to complain about the
illegal CIA activities for some time. As Meyer pointed out, this
directive “was a hunting license for the resentful subordinate to dig
back into the records of the past in order to come up with evidence
that might destroy the career of a superior whom he long hated.” Meyer
also suffered during this period and James Schlesinger moved him to
London where he became CIA chief of station in England.

In March, 1976, James Truitt gave an interview to the National
Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Mary Pinchot Meyer was having
an affair with John F. Kennedy. He also claimed that Meyer had told
his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this
relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a
private diary “if anything ever happened to me”.
Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time of the murder. She phoned
Ben Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary.
Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law’s affair with
Kennedy, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did
after Truitt’s phone-call: “We didn’t start looking until the next
morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to
Mary’s house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got
inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us
he, too, was looking for Mary’s diary.”

James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief, admitted that he knew
of Mary’s relationship with John F. Kennedy and was searching her home
looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the
affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary’s sister, Antoinette
Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was
claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary’s studio. The
contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the
diary. Angleton later admitted that Mary recorded in her diary that
she had taken LSD with Kennedy before “they made love”.

Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post
that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was
that: “She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved
in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the
beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, ‘It wasn’t Camelot, it
was Caligula’s court’?” Damore also said that a figure close to the
CIA had told him that Mary’s death had been a professional “hit”.

There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were
searching for documents in Meyer’s house. Were they looking for
material that Meyer had been collecting on CIA’s covert activities?

After leaving the CIA in 1977 Meyer became a a nationally syndicated
columnist. He also wrote several books including an autobiography,
Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA. In the book Meyer
commented on the murder of his wife: “I was satisfied by the
conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim
of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she
had been killed in her struggle to escape.” Carol Delaney, the
longtime personal assistant to Meyer, later admitted: “Mr. Meyer
didn’t for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that
it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn’t
very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the
markings of an in-house rubout.”

In February, 2001, the writer, C. David Heymann, asked Cord Meyer
about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer: “My father died of a heart
attack the same year Mary was killed , “ he whispered. “It was a bad
time.” And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such
a heinous crime? “The same sons of bitches,” he hissed, “that killed
John F. Kennedy.”
Cord Meyer died of lymphoma on 13th March, 2001.
dusty
2012-01-10 04:47:13 UTC
Permalink
Self criticism: It's a bad idea to be too hasty in reading material
and falling for a sleight-of-hand!

What the WRP did in drawing on their "Cord Meyer Connection" was to
make an amalgam between the President of Carleton College, Lawrence
Gould and Cord Meyer through his sponsorship of the World Federalist
movement. They might as well have said that Albert Einstein was part
of that group - as he was. It contained a mixture of Pacifists,
Liberals, Communists and others who were to become operatives. The
only way that this 'evidence' could be of value would be if the
connections with Gould were maintained after Cord Meyer started to
work for and later took up the offer and went into the CIA.

Nevertheless, I will post the interesting piece on Cord Meyer. It
contains evidence of some fascinating cross currents:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKmeyerC.htm

Cord Meyer, the son of a senior diplomat, was born on 10th November,
1920. The Meyer family was extremely wealthy and had made its money
from sugar in Cuba and from property on Long Island.

The family settled in New York City . Cord and his twin brother,
Quintin, attended private school in Switzerland and then St. Paul's
preparatory school in New Hampshire. In 1939 Meyer went to Yale
University to study literature and philosophy. After graduating in
1942 he joined the US Marines.

Meyer was sent to the South Pacific and wrote articles about his
experiences for The Atlantic Monthly. Meyer was a machine-gun platoon
leader and took part in the assault on Guam. He later wrote: "As we
buried our dead I swore to myself that if it was within my power I
should see to it that these deaths would not be forgotten or valued
lightly. No matter how small a contribution I should happen to make it
would be in the right direction."

On 21st July, 1944, a Japanese grenade was thrown into his foxhole. He
was so badly injured that when he was found he was initially declared
to be dead. In fact, his commanding officer sent a telegram to his
parents announcing he had died. Although he lost his left eye he was
eventually well enough to be sent home. Soon afterwards his twin
brother, Quentin, was killed at Okinawa.

While recovered in New York City Meyer met the journalist, Mary
Pinchot. The couple married on 19th April, 1945. The couple then went
to San Francisco to attend the conference that established the United
Nations. Cord went as an aide to Harold Stassen, whereas Mary, who was
working for the North American Newspaper Alliance at the time, was one
of the reporters sent to cover this important event.


Meyer told te New York Times that although the United Nations was a
step in the right direction "that the veto power was just another
alliance of the great powers and one that would surely lead to another
war." Cord proposed that the UN be granted authority to oversee
nuclear power installations inside member countries. He also argued
that the UN should be given the authority to prevent war and "the
armed power to back it up."

While at the San Francisco Conference he met John F. Kennedy for the
first time. They disagreed about the merits of the United Nations.
Kennedy was far more hopeful of its long-term success and disliked
Meyer's ideas on world government. Meyer also objected to Kennedy's
relationship with his new wife.

Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima
and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz
called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the
definitive statement about the dangers of the atomic age. Cord wrote
at the time: "Talked with Mary of how steadily depressing is our full
realization of how little hope there is of avoiding the approaching
catastrophe of atomic warfare."

The following year he published a book about his war experiences,
Waves of Darkness. Meyer expressed his pacifist views in the book:
"The only certain fruit of this insanity will be the rotting bodies
upon which the sun will impartially shine tomorrow. Let us throw down
these guns that we hate."

Meyer became an advocate of world government. In May, 1947, Cord Meyer
was elected president of the United World Federalists. Under his
leadership, membership of the organization doubled in size. Albert
Einstein was one of his most important supporters and personally
solicited funds for the organization. Mary Meyer was also active in
the organization and wrote for its journal, The United World
Federalists.

In 1949 Meyer and his family moved to Cambridge. He was showing signs
of becoming disillusioned with the idea of world government. He had
experienced problems with members of the American Communist Party who
had infiltrated the organizations he had established. It was about
this time that he began working secretly for the Central Intelligence
Agency.

In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with
Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of
this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative
Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the
Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against
Imperialism. It is almost certain that this had been done on behalf of
the CIA.

Allen W. Dulles made contact with Cord Meyer in 1951. He accepted the
invitation to join the CIA. Dulles told Meyer he wanted him to work on
a project that was so secret that he could not be told about it until
he officially joined the organization. Meyer was to work under Frank
Wisner, director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This
became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the CIA.
Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on
"propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including
sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures;
subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground
resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements
in threatened countries of the free world."

Meyer became part of what became known as Operation Mockingbird, a CIA
program to influence the American media. According to Deborah Davis
(Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer
was Mockingbird's "principal operative".

One of the most important journalists under the control of Operation
Mockingbird was Joseph Alsop, whose articles appeared in over 300
different newspapers. Other journalists willing to promote the views
of the Central Intelligence Agency included Stewart Alsop (New York
Herald Tribune), Ben Bradlee (Newsweek), James Reston (New York
Times), Charles Douglas Jackson (Time Magazine), Walter Pincus
(Washington Post), William C. Baggs (Miami News), Herb Gold (Miami
News) and Charles Bartlett (Chattanooga Times). These journalists
sometimes wrote articles that were unofficially commissioned by Meyer
was based on leaked classified information from the CIA.

Mary and the family now moved to Washington where they became members
of the Georgetown Crowd. This group included Frank Wisner, George
Kennan, Dean Acheson, Thomas Braden, Richard Bissell, Desmond
FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine
Graham, David Bruce, James Reston, James Truitt, Alfred Friendly,
Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul
Nitze. The Meyers also socialized with other CIA officers or CIA
assets including James Angleton (Cicely Angleton), Wistar Janney (Mary
Wisnar), Ben Bradlee (Antoinette Bradlee) and James Truitt (Anne
Truitt).

Meyer worked under Thomas Braden, the head of International
Organizations Division (IOD). This Central Intelligence Agency unit
helped established anti-Communist front groups in Western Europe.The
IOD was dedicated to infiltrating academic, trade and political
associations. The objective was to control potential radicals and to
steer them to the right.

Meyer oversaw the funding of groups such as the National Student
Association, the Congress of Cultural Freedom, Communications Workers
of America, the American Newspaper Guild and the National Educational
Association. He also provided the money for publishing the journal,
Encounter. Meyer also worked closely with anti-Communist leaders of
the trade union movement such as George Meany of the Congress for
Industrial Organization and the American Federation of Labor.

In 1953 Frank Wisner and the CIA began having trouble with J. Edgar
Hoover. He described the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC) as
"Wisner's gang of weirdos" and began carrying out investigations into
their past. It did not take him long to discover that some of them had
been active in left-wing politics in the 1930s. This information was
passed to Joseph McCarthy who started making attacks on members of the
OPC. Hoover also passed to McCarthy details of an affair that Wisner
had with Princess Caradja in Romania during the war. Hoover, claimed
that Caradja was a Soviet agent.

Joseph McCarthy also began accusing other members of the Georgetown
Crowd as being security risks. McCarthy claimed that the CIA was a
"sinkhole of communists" and claimed he intended to root out a hundred
of them. His first targets were Chip Bohlen and Charles Thayer. Bohlen
survived but Thayer was forced to resign.

In August, 1953, Richard Helms, Wisner's deputy at the OPC, told Meyer
that Joseph McCarthy had accused him of being a communist. The Federal
Bureau of Investigation added to the smear by announcing it was
unwilling to give Meyer "security clearance". However, the FBI refused
to explain what evidence they had against Meyer. Allen W. Dulles and
both came to his defence and refused to permit a FBI interrogation of
Meyer.

The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he
was a member of several liberal groups considered to be subversive by
the Justice Department. This included being a member of the National
Council on the Arts, where he associated with Norman Thomas, the
leader of the Socialist Party and its presidential candidate in 1948.
It was also pointed out that his wife, Mary Meyer, was a former member
of the American Labor Party. Meyer was eventually cleared of these
charges and was allowed to keep his job.

J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph McCarthy did not realise what they were
taking on. Wisner unleashed Operation Mockingbird on McCarthy. Drew
Pearson, Joe Alsop, Jack Anderson, Walter Lippmann and Ed Murrow all
went into attack mode and McCarthy was permanently damaged by the
press coverage orchestrated by Wisner.

Meyer became disillusioned with life in the CIA and in January, 1954,
he went to New York City and attempted to get a job in publishing.
Although he saw contacts he had made during his covert work with the
media (Operation Mockingbird) he was unable to obtain a job with any
of the established book publishing firms.

In the summer of 1954 the Meyer family's golden retriever was hit by a
car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. The dog's
death worried Cord. He told colleagues at the CIA he was afraid the
same thing might happen to one of his children.

In the summer of 1954 the Meyers got new neighbours. John F. Kennedy
and his wife Jackie Kennedy purchased Hickory Hill, a house several
hundred yards from where the Meyers lived. Mary became good friends
with Jackie and they went on walks together.

In November, 1954, Meyer replaced Thomas Braden as head of
International Organizations Division. Meyer began spending a lot of
time in Europe. One of Meyer's tasks was to supervise Radio Free
Europe and Radio Liberty, the United States government broadcasts to
Eastern Europe. According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman)
Meyer was "overseeing a vast 'black' budget of millions of dollars
channeled through phony foundation of a global network of associations
and labor groups that on their surface appeared to be progressive".

On 18th December, 1956, Cord's nine-year-old son, Michael, was hit by
a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. It was the
same spot where the family's golden retriever had been killed two
years earlier. The tragedy briefly brought the couple together.
However, in 1958, Mary filed for divorce. In her divorce petition she
alleged "extreme cruelty, mental in nature, which seriously injured
her health, destroyed her happiness, rendered further cohabitation
unendurable and compelled the parties to separate."

Meyer's career continued to prosper and was now high enough in the CIA
hierarchy to be involved in covert operations. This included working
with people like Richard Bissell, Frank Wisner, Tracy Barnes, Jake
Esterline, David Atlee Phillips, William (Rip) Robertson and E. Howard
Hunt. Bissell, who was now head of the OPC, described Meyer as the
"creative genius behind covert operations".

As chief of the CIA's International Organizations Division, Meyer met
with President John F. Kennedy and his staff. On 18th October, 1961,
Kennedy consulted Meyer about the possibility of replacing Allen W.
Dulles with John McCone. In his journal he reported that Kennedy was
"much more serious and less arrogant than I'd known him before." He
added that Kennedy "still yearns for a respect that eludes him from
such as myself."

It is assumed that Cord was involved in the plot to assassinate Fidel
Castro but so far no documents have been released to confirm this.
Cord also met Robert Kennedy several times after the failed Bay of
Pigs operation.

In 1961 James Jesus Angleton asked Ben Bradlee to suggest to John F.
Kennedy that Meyer should become ambassador to Guatemala. Bradlee, who
disliked Meyer, refused. Bradlee later claimed that he did not respond
to this request because he knew that Kennedy would reject the idea.
Meyer also asked Charles L. Bartlett, another journalist friend of
Kennedy to suggest he should be given a political appointment.
Bartlett did as requested but reported back that "due to some incident
that occured at the U.N. conference in San Francisco in 1945 there was
no possibility".

On 12th October, 1964, Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead as she walked
along the Chesapeake and Ohio towpath in Georgetown. Henry Wiggins, a
car mechanic, was working on a vehicle on Canal Road, when he heard a
woman shout out: "Someone help me, someone help me". He then heard two
gunshots. Wiggins ran to the edge of the wall overlooking the towpath.
He later told police he saw "a black man in a light jacket, dark
slacks, and a dark cap standing over the body of a white woman."

Soon afterwards Raymond Crump, a black man, was found not far from the
murder scene. He was arrested and charged with Mary's murder. The
towpath and the river were searched but no murder weapon was ever
found.



The murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer



The media did not report at the time that Meyer had been having an
affair with John F. Kennedy. Nor did it reveal that her former husband
was a senior figure in CIA's covert operations. As a result, there was
little public interest in the case.

During the trial Wiggins was unable to identify Raymond Crump as the
man standing over Meyer's body. The prosecution was also handicapped
by the fact that the police had been unable to find the murder weapon
at the scene of the crime. On 29th July, 1965, Crump was acquitted of
murdering Mary Meyer. The case remains unsolved.

At the end of 1966 Desmond FitzGerald, head of the Directorate for
Plans, discovered that Ramparts, a left-wing publication, had
discovered that the CIA had been secretly funding the National Student
Association. FitzGerald ordered Edgar Applewhite to organize a
campaign against the magazine. Applewhite later told Evan Thomas for
his book, The Very Best Men: "I had all sorts of dirty tricks to hurt
their circulation and financing. The people running Ramparts were
vulnerable to blackmail. We had awful things in mind, some of which we
carried off."

This dirty tricks campaign failed to stop Ramparts publishing in
March, 1967. The article, written by Sol Stern, was entitled NSA and
the CIA. As well as reporting CIA funding of the National Student
Association it exposed the whole system of anti-Communist front
organizations in Europe, Asia, and South America. It named Meyer as a
key figure in this campaign. This included the funding of the literary
journal Encounter.

In May 1967 Thomas Braden responded to this by publishing an article
entitled, I'm Glad the CIA is Immoral, in the Saturday Evening Post,
where he defended the activities of the International Organizations
Division unit of the CIA.

In 1967 Meyer became assistant deputy director of plans, a post in
which he worked with spymaster Thomas H. Karamessines. However, the
publicity brought about by the Ramparts revealations did not help his
career.

Meyer role in Operation Mockingbird was further exposed in 1972 when
he was accused of interfering with the publication of a book, The
Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asia by Alfred W. McCoy. The book was
highly critical of the CIA's dealings with the drug traffic in
Southeast Asia. The publisher, who leaked the story, had been a former
colleague of Meyer's when he was a liberal activist after the war.

During the Watergate Scandal President Richard Nixon became concerned
about the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency. Three of
those involved in the burglary, E. Howard Hunt, Eugenio Martinez and
James W. McCord had close links with the CIA. Nixon and his aides
attempted to force the CIA director, Richard Helms, and his deputy,
Vernon Walters, to pay hush-money to Hunt, who was attempting to
blackmail the government. Although it seemed Walters was willing to do
this, Helms refused. In February, 1973, Nixon sacked Helms. His
deputy, Thomas H. Karamessines, resigned in protest.

James Schlesinger now became the new director of the CIA. Schlesinger
was heard to say: “The clandestine service was Helms’s Praetorian
Guard. It had too much influence in the Agency and was too powerful
within the government. I am going to cut it down to size.” This he did
and over the next three months over 7 per cent of CIA officers lost
their jobs.

On 9th May, 1973, Schlesinger issued a directive to all CIA employees:
“I have ordered all senior operating officials of this Agency to
report to me immediately on any activities now going on, or might have
gone on in the past, which might be considered to be outside the
legislative charter of this Agency. I hereby direct every person
presently employed by CIA to report to me on any such activities of
which he has knowledge. I invite all ex-employees to do the same.
Anyone who has such information should call my secretary and say that
he wishes to talk to me about “activities outside the CIA’s charter”.

There were several employees who had been trying to complain about the
illegal CIA activities for some time. As Meyer pointed out, this
directive “was a hunting license for the resentful subordinate to dig
back into the records of the past in order to come up with evidence
that might destroy the career of a superior whom he long hated.” Meyer
also suffered during this period and James Schlesinger moved him to
London where he became CIA chief of station in England.

In March, 1976, James Truitt gave an interview to the National
Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Mary Pinchot Meyer was having
an affair with John F. Kennedy. He also claimed that Meyer had told
his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this
relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a
private diary "if anything ever happened to me".

Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time of the murder. She phoned
Ben Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary.
Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law's affair with
Kennedy, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did
after Truitt's phone-call: "We didn't start looking until the next
morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to
Mary's house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got
inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us
he, too, was looking for Mary's diary."

James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief, admitted that he knew
of Mary's relationship with John F. Kennedy and was searching her home
looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the
affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary's sister, Antoinette
Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was
claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary's studio. The
contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the
diary. Angleton later admitted that Mary recorded in her diary that
she had taken LSD with Kennedy before "they made love".

Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post
that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was
that: "She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved
in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the
beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, 'It wasn't Camelot, it
was Caligula's court'?" Damore also said that a figure close to the
CIA had told him that Mary's death had been a professional "hit".

There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were
searching for documents in Meyer's house. Were they looking for
material that Meyer had been collecting on CIA's covert activities?

After leaving the CIA in 1977 Meyer became a a nationally syndicated
columnist. He also wrote several books including an autobiography,
Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA. In the book Meyer
commented on the murder of his wife: "I was satisfied by the
conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim
of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she
had been killed in her struggle to escape." Carol Delaney, the
longtime personal assistant to Meyer, later admitted: "Mr. Meyer
didn't for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that
it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn't
very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the
markings of an in-house rubout."

In February, 2001, the writer, C. David Heymann, asked Cord Meyer
about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer: "My father died of a heart
attack the same year Mary was killed , " he whispered. "It was a bad
time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such
a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed
John F. Kennedy."

Cord Meyer died of lymphoma on 13th March, 2001.
Vngelis
2012-01-11 22:44:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by dusty
Self criticism: It's a bad idea to be too hasty in reading material
and falling for a sleight-of-hand!
What the WRP did in drawing on their "Cord Meyer Connection" was to
make an amalgam between the President of Carleton College, Lawrence
Gould and Cord Meyer through his sponsorship of the World Federalist
movement. They might as well have said that Albert Einstein was part
of that group - as he was. It contained a mixture of Pacifists,
Liberals, Communists and others who were to become operatives. The
only way that this 'evidence' could be of value would be if the
connections with Gould were maintained after Cord Meyer started to
work for and later took up the offer and went into the CIA.
Nevertheless, I will post the interesting piece on Cord Meyer. It
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKmeyerC.htm
Cord Meyer, the son of a senior diplomat, was born on 10th November,
1920. The Meyer family was extremely wealthy and had made its money
from sugar in Cuba and from property on Long Island.
The family settled in New York City . Cord and his twin brother,
Quintin, attended private school in Switzerland and then St. Paul's
preparatory school in New Hampshire. In 1939 Meyer went to Yale
University to study literature and philosophy. After graduating in
1942 he joined the US Marines.
Meyer was sent to the South Pacific and wrote articles about his
experiences for The Atlantic Monthly. Meyer was a machine-gun platoon
leader and took part in the assault on Guam. He later wrote: "As we
buried our dead I swore to myself that if it was within my power I
should see to it that these deaths would not be forgotten or valued
lightly. No matter how small a contribution I should happen to make it
would be in the right direction."
On 21st July, 1944, a Japanese grenade was thrown into his foxhole. He
was so badly injured that when he was found he was initially declared
to be dead. In fact, his commanding officer sent a telegram to his
parents announcing he had died. Although he lost his left eye he was
eventually well enough to be sent home. Soon afterwards his twin
brother, Quentin, was killed at Okinawa.
While recovered in New York City Meyer met the journalist, Mary
Pinchot. The couple married on 19th April, 1945. The couple then went
to San Francisco to attend the conference that established the United
Nations. Cord went as an aide to Harold Stassen, whereas Mary, who was
working for the North American Newspaper Alliance at the time, was one
of the reporters sent to cover this important event.
Meyer told te New York Times that although the United Nations was a
step in the right direction "that the veto power was just another
alliance of the great powers and one that would surely lead to another
war." Cord proposed that the UN be granted authority to oversee
nuclear power installations inside member countries. He also argued
that the UN should be given the authority to prevent war and "the
armed power to back it up."
While at the San Francisco Conference he met John F. Kennedy for the
first time. They disagreed about the merits of the United Nations.
Kennedy was far more hopeful of its long-term success and disliked
Meyer's ideas on world government. Meyer also objected to Kennedy's
relationship with his new wife.
Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima
and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz
called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the
at the time: "Talked with Mary of how steadily depressing is our full
realization of how little hope there is of avoiding the approaching
catastrophe of atomic warfare."
The following year he published a book about his war experiences,
"The only certain fruit of this insanity will be the rotting bodies
upon which the sun will impartially shine tomorrow. Let us throw down
these guns that we hate."
Meyer became an advocate of world government. In May, 1947, Cord Meyer
was elected president of the United World Federalists. Under his
leadership, membership of the organization doubled in size. Albert
Einstein was one of his most important supporters and personally
solicited funds for the organization. Mary Meyer was also active in
the organization and wrote for its journal, The United World
Federalists.
In 1949 Meyer and his family moved to Cambridge. He was showing signs
of becoming disillusioned with the idea of world government. He had
experienced problems with members of the American Communist Party who
had infiltrated the organizations he had established. It was about
this time that he began working secretly for the Central Intelligence
Agency.
In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with
Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of
this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative
Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the
Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against
Imperialism. It is almost certain that this had been done on behalf of
the CIA.
Allen W. Dulles made contact with Cord Meyer in 1951. He accepted the
invitation to join the CIA. Dulles told Meyer he wanted him to work on
a project that was so secret that he could not be told about it until
he officially joined the organization. Meyer was to work under Frank
Wisner, director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This
became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the CIA.
Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on
"propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including
sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures;
subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground
resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements
in threatened countries of the free world."
Meyer became part of what became known as Operation Mockingbird, a CIA
program to influence the American media. According to Deborah Davis
(Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer
was Mockingbird's "principal operative".
One of the most important journalists under the control of Operation
Mockingbird was Joseph Alsop, whose articles appeared in over 300
different newspapers. Other journalists willing to promote the views
of the Central Intelligence Agency included Stewart Alsop (New York
Herald Tribune), Ben Bradlee (Newsweek), James Reston (New York
Times), Charles Douglas Jackson (Time Magazine), Walter Pincus
(Washington Post), William C. Baggs (Miami News), Herb Gold (Miami
News) and Charles Bartlett (Chattanooga Times). These journalists
sometimes wrote articles that were unofficially commissioned by Meyer
was based on leaked classified information from the CIA.
Mary and the family now moved to Washington where they became members
of the Georgetown Crowd. This group included Frank Wisner, George
Kennan, Dean Acheson, Thomas Braden, Richard Bissell, Desmond
FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine
Graham, David Bruce, James Reston, James Truitt, Alfred Friendly,
Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul
Nitze. The Meyers also socialized with other CIA officers or CIA
assets including James Angleton (Cicely Angleton), Wistar Janney (Mary
Wisnar), Ben Bradlee (Antoinette Bradlee) and James Truitt (Anne
Truitt).
Meyer worked under Thomas Braden, the head of International
Organizations Division (IOD). This Central Intelligence Agency unit
helped established anti-Communist front groups in Western Europe.The
IOD was dedicated to infiltrating academic, trade and political
associations. The objective was to control potential radicals and to
steer them to the right.
Meyer oversaw the funding of groups such as the National Student
Association, the Congress of Cultural Freedom, Communications Workers
of America, the American Newspaper Guild and the National Educational
Association. He also provided the money for publishing the journal,
Encounter. Meyer also worked closely with anti-Communist leaders of
the trade union movement such as George Meany of the Congress for
Industrial Organization and the American Federation of Labor.
In 1953 Frank Wisner and the CIA began having trouble with J. Edgar
Hoover. He described the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC) as
"Wisner's gang of weirdos" and began carrying out investigations into
their past. It did not take him long to discover that some of them had
been active in left-wing politics in the 1930s. This information was
passed to Joseph McCarthy who started making attacks on members of the
OPC. Hoover also passed to McCarthy details of an affair that Wisner
had with Princess Caradja in Romania during the war. Hoover, claimed
that Caradja was a Soviet agent.
Joseph McCarthy also began accusing other members of the Georgetown
Crowd as being security risks. McCarthy claimed that the CIA was a
"sinkhole of communists" and claimed he intended to root out a hundred
of them. His first targets were Chip Bohlen and Charles Thayer. Bohlen
survived but Thayer was forced to resign.
In August, 1953, Richard Helms, Wisner's deputy at the OPC, told Meyer
that Joseph McCarthy had accused him of being a communist. The Federal
Bureau of Investigation added to the smear by announcing it was
unwilling to give Meyer "security clearance". However, the FBI refused
to explain what evidence they had against Meyer. Allen W. Dulles and
both came to his defence and refused to permit a FBI interrogation of
Meyer.
The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he
was a member of several liberal groups considered to be subversive by
the Justice Department. This included being a member of the National
Council on the Arts, where he associated with Norman Thomas, the
leader of the Socialist Party and its presidential candidate in 1948.
It was also pointed out that his wife, Mary Meyer, was a former member
of the American Labor Party. Meyer was eventually cleared of these
charges and was allowed to keep his job.
J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph McCarthy did not realise what they were
taking on. Wisner unleashed Operation Mockingbird on McCarthy. Drew
Pearson, Joe Alsop, Jack Anderson, Walter Lippmann and Ed Murrow all
went into attack mode and McCarthy was permanently damaged by the
press coverage orchestrated by Wisner.
Meyer became disillusioned with life in the CIA and in January, 1954,
he went to New York City and attempted to get a job in publishing.
Although he saw contacts he had made during his covert work with the
media (Operation Mockingbird) he was unable to obtain a job with any
of the established book publishing firms.
In the summer of 1954 the Meyer family's golden retriever was hit by a
car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. The dog's
death worried Cord. He told colleagues at the CIA he was afraid the
same thing might happen to one of his children.
In the summer of 1954 the Meyers got new neighbours. John F. Kennedy
and his wife Jackie Kennedy purchased Hickory Hill, a house several
hundred yards from where the Meyers lived. Mary became good friends
with Jackie and they went on walks together.
In November, 1954, Meyer replaced Thomas Braden as head of
International Organizations Division. Meyer began spending a lot of
time in Europe. One of Meyer's tasks was to supervise Radio Free
Europe and Radio Liberty, the United States government broadcasts to
Eastern Europe. According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman)
Meyer was "overseeing a vast 'black' budget of millions of dollars
channeled through phony foundation of a global network of associations
and labor groups that on their surface appeared to be progressive".
On 18th December, 1956, Cord's nine-year-old son, Michael, was hit by
a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. It was the
same spot where the family's golden retriever had been killed two
years earlier. The tragedy briefly brought the couple together.
However, in 1958, Mary filed for divorce. In her divorce petition she
alleged "extreme cruelty, mental in nature, which seriously injured
her health, destroyed her happiness, rendered further cohabitation
unendurable and compelled the parties to separate."
Meyer's career continued to prosper and was now high enough in the CIA
hierarchy to be involved in covert operations. This included working
with people like Richard Bissell, Frank Wisner, Tracy Barnes, Jake
Esterline, David Atlee Phillips, William (Rip) Robertson and E. Howard
Hunt. Bissell, who was now head of the OPC, described Meyer as the
"creative genius behind covert operations".
As chief of the CIA's International Organizations Division, Meyer met
with President John F. Kennedy and his staff. On 18th October, 1961,
Kennedy consulted Meyer about the possibility of replacing Allen W.
Dulles with John McCone. In his journal he reported that Kennedy was
"much more serious and less arrogant than I'd known him before." He
added that Kennedy "still yearns for a respect that eludes him from
such as myself."
It is assumed that Cord was involved in the plot to assassinate Fidel
Castro but so far no documents have been released to confirm this.
Cord also met Robert Kennedy several times after the failed Bay of
Pigs operation.
In 1961 James Jesus Angleton asked Ben Bradlee to suggest to John F.
Kennedy that Meyer should become ambassador to Guatemala. Bradlee, who
disliked Meyer, refused. Bradlee later claimed that he did not respond
to this request because he knew that Kennedy would reject the idea.
Meyer also asked Charles L. Bartlett, another journalist friend of
Kennedy to suggest he should be given a political appointment.
Bartlett did as requested but reported back that "due to some incident
that occured at the U.N. conference in San Francisco in 1945 there was
no possibility".
On 12th October, 1964, Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead as she walked
along the Chesapeake and Ohio towpath in Georgetown. Henry Wiggins, a
car mechanic, was working on a vehicle on Canal Road, when he heard a
woman shout out: "Someone help me, someone help me". He then heard two
gunshots. Wiggins ran to the edge of the wall overlooking the towpath.
He later told police he saw "a black man in a light jacket, dark
slacks, and a dark cap standing over the body of a white woman."
Soon afterwards Raymond Crump, a black man, was found not far from the
murder scene. He was arrested and charged with Mary's murder. The
towpath and the river were searched but no murder weapon was ever
found.
The murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer
The media did not report at the time that Meyer had been having an
affair with John F. Kennedy. Nor did it reveal that her former husband
was a senior figure in CIA's covert operations. As a result, there was
little public interest in the case.
During the trial Wiggins was unable to identify Raymond Crump as the
man standing over Meyer's body. The prosecution was also handicapped
by the fact that the police had been unable to find the murder weapon
at the scene of the crime. On 29th July, 1965, Crump was acquitted of
murdering Mary Meyer. The case remains unsolved.
At the end of 1966 Desmond FitzGerald, head of the Directorate for
Plans, discovered that Ramparts, a left-wing publication, had
discovered that the CIA had been secretly funding the National Student
Association. FitzGerald ordered Edgar Applewhite to organize a
campaign against the magazine. Applewhite later told Evan Thomas for
his book, The Very Best Men: "I had all sorts of dirty tricks to hurt
their circulation and financing. The people running Ramparts were
vulnerable to blackmail. We had awful things in mind, some of which we
carried off."
This dirty tricks campaign failed to stop Ramparts publishing in
March, 1967. The article, written by Sol Stern, was entitled NSA and
the CIA. As well as reporting CIA funding of the National Student
Association it exposed the whole system of anti-Communist front
organizations in Europe, Asia, and South America. It named Meyer as a
key figure in this campaign. This included the funding of the literary
journal Encounter.
In May 1967 Thomas Braden responded to this by publishing an article
entitled, I'm Glad the CIA is Immoral, in the Saturday Evening Post,
where he defended the activities of the International Organizations
Division unit of the CIA.
In 1967 Meyer became assistant deputy director of plans, a post in
which he worked with spymaster Thomas H. Karamessines. However, the
publicity brought about by the Ramparts revealations did not help his
career.
Meyer role in Operation Mockingbird was further exposed in 1972 when
he was accused of interfering with the publication of a book, The
Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asia by Alfred W. McCoy. The book was
highly critical of the CIA's dealings with the drug traffic in
Southeast Asia. The publisher, who leaked the story, had been a former
colleague of Meyer's when he was a liberal activist after the war.
During the Watergate Scandal President Richard Nixon became concerned
about the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency. Three of
those involved in the burglary, E. Howard Hunt, Eugenio Martinez and
James W. McCord had close links with the CIA. Nixon and his aides
attempted to force the CIA director, Richard Helms, and his deputy,
Vernon Walters, to pay hush-money to Hunt, who was attempting to
blackmail the government. Although it seemed Walters was willing to do
this, Helms refused. In February, 1973, Nixon sacked Helms. His
deputy, Thomas H. Karamessines, resigned in protest.
James Schlesinger now became the new director of the CIA. Schlesinger
was heard to say: “The clandestine service was Helms’s Praetorian
Guard. It had too much influence in the Agency and was too powerful
within the government. I am going to cut it down to size.” This he did
and over the next three months over 7 per cent of CIA officers lost
their jobs.
“I have ordered all senior operating officials of this Agency to
report to me immediately on any activities now going on, or might have
gone on in the past, which might be considered to be outside the
legislative charter of this Agency. I hereby direct every person
presently employed by CIA to report to me on any such activities of
which he has knowledge. I invite all ex-employees to do the same.
Anyone who has such information should call my secretary and say that
he wishes to talk to me about “activities outside the CIA’s charter”.
There were several employees who had been trying to complain about the
illegal CIA activities for some time. As Meyer pointed out, this
directive “was a hunting license for the resentful subordinate to dig
back into the records of the past in order to come up with evidence
that might destroy the career of a superior whom he long hated.” Meyer
also suffered during this period and James Schlesinger moved him to
London where he became CIA chief of station in England.
In March, 1976, James Truitt gave an interview to the National
Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Mary Pinchot Meyer was having
an affair with John F. Kennedy. He also claimed that Meyer had told
his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this
relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a
private diary "if anything ever happened to me".
Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time of the murder. She phoned
Ben Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary.
Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law's affair with
Kennedy, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did
after Truitt's phone-call: "We didn't start looking until the next
morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to
Mary's house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got
inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us
he, too, was looking for Mary's diary."
James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief, admitted that he knew
of Mary's relationship with John F. Kennedy and was searching her home
looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the
affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary's sister, Antoinette
Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was
claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary's studio. The
contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the
diary. Angleton later admitted that Mary recorded in her diary that
she had taken LSD with Kennedy before "they made love".
Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post
that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was
that: "She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved
in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the
beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, 'It wasn't Camelot, it
was Caligula's court'?" Damore also said that a figure close to the
CIA had told him that Mary's death had been a professional "hit".
There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were
searching for documents in Meyer's house. Were they looking for
material that Meyer had been collecting on CIA's covert activities?
After leaving the CIA in 1977 Meyer became a a nationally syndicated
columnist. He also wrote several books including an autobiography,
Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA. In the book Meyer
commented on the murder of his wife: "I was satisfied by the
conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim
of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she
had been killed in her struggle to escape." Carol Delaney, the
longtime personal assistant to Meyer, later admitted: "Mr. Meyer
didn't for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that
it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn't
very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the
markings of an in-house rubout."
In February, 2001, the writer, C. David Heymann, asked Cord Meyer
about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer: "My father died of a heart
attack the same year Mary was killed , " he whispered. "It was a bad
time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such
a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed
John F. Kennedy."
Cord Meyer died of lymphoma on 13th March, 2001.
How journalists were bought and syndicated, this has now occurred
throughout Europe.
No wonder the Greeks chants Scumbags, Grassers Journos...

vngelis
Vngelis
2012-01-11 22:30:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by dusty
Self criticism: It's a bad idea to be too hasty in reading material
and falling for a sleight-of-hand!
What the WRP did in drawing on their "Cord Meyer Connection" was to
make an amalgam between the President of Carleton College, Lawrence
Gould and Cord Meyer through his sponsorship of the World Federalist
movement. They might as well have said that Albert Einstein was part
of that group - as he was. It contained a mixture of Pacifists,
Liberals, Communists and others who were to become operatives. The
only way that this 'evidence' could be of value would be if the
connections with Gould were maintained after Cord Meyer started to
work for and later took up the offer and went into the CIA.
Nevertheless, I will post the interesting piece on Cord Meyer. It
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKmeyerC.htm
Cord Meyer, the son of a senior diplomat, was born on 10th November,
1920. The Meyer family was extremely wealthy and had made its money
from sugar in Cuba and from property on Long Island.
The family settled in New York City . Cord and his twin brother,
Quintin, attended private school in Switzerland and then St. Paul's
preparatory school in New Hampshire. In 1939 Meyer went to Yale
University to study literature and philosophy. After graduating in
1942 he joined the US Marines.
Meyer was sent to the South Pacific and wrote articles about his
experiences for The Atlantic Monthly. Meyer was a machine-gun platoon
leader and took part in the assault on Guam. He later wrote: "As we
buried our dead I swore to myself that if it was within my power I
should see to it that these deaths would not be forgotten or valued
lightly. No matter how small a contribution I should happen to make it
would be in the right direction."
On 21st July, 1944, a Japanese grenade was thrown into his foxhole. He
was so badly injured that when he was found he was initially declared
to be dead. In fact, his commanding officer sent a telegram to his
parents announcing he had died. Although he lost his left eye he was
eventually well enough to be sent home. Soon afterwards his twin
brother, Quentin, was killed at Okinawa.
While recovered in New York City Meyer met the journalist, Mary
Pinchot. The couple married on 19th April, 1945. The couple then went
to San Francisco to attend the conference that established the United
Nations. Cord went as an aide to Harold Stassen, whereas Mary, who was
working for the North American Newspaper Alliance at the time, was one
of the reporters sent to cover this important event.
Meyer told te New York Times that although the United Nations was a
step in the right direction "that the veto power was just another
alliance of the great powers and one that would surely lead to another
war." Cord proposed that the UN be granted authority to oversee
nuclear power installations inside member countries. He also argued
that the UN should be given the authority to prevent war and "the
armed power to back it up."
While at the San Francisco Conference he met John F. Kennedy for the
first time. They disagreed about the merits of the United Nations.
Kennedy was far more hopeful of its long-term success and disliked
Meyer's ideas on world government. Meyer also objected to Kennedy's
relationship with his new wife.
Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima
and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz
called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the
at the time: "Talked with Mary of how steadily depressing is our full
realization of how little hope there is of avoiding the approaching
catastrophe of atomic warfare."
The following year he published a book about his war experiences,
"The only certain fruit of this insanity will be the rotting bodies
upon which the sun will impartially shine tomorrow. Let us throw down
these guns that we hate."
Meyer became an advocate of world government. In May, 1947, Cord Meyer
was elected president of the United World Federalists. Under his
leadership, membership of the organization doubled in size. Albert
Einstein was one of his most important supporters and personally
solicited funds for the organization. Mary Meyer was also active in
the organization and wrote for its journal, The United World
Federalists.
In 1949 Meyer and his family moved to Cambridge. He was showing signs
of becoming disillusioned with the idea of world government. He had
experienced problems with members of the American Communist Party who
had infiltrated the organizations he had established. It was about
this time that he began working secretly for the Central Intelligence
Agency.
In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with
Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of
this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative
Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the
Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against
Imperialism. It is almost certain that this had been done on behalf of
the CIA.
Allen W. Dulles made contact with Cord Meyer in 1951. He accepted the
invitation to join the CIA. Dulles told Meyer he wanted him to work on
a project that was so secret that he could not be told about it until
he officially joined the organization. Meyer was to work under Frank
Wisner, director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This
became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the CIA.
Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on
"propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including
sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures;
subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground
resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements
in threatened countries of the free world."
Meyer became part of what became known as Operation Mockingbird, a CIA
program to influence the American media. According to Deborah Davis
(Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer
was Mockingbird's "principal operative".
One of the most important journalists under the control of Operation
Mockingbird was Joseph Alsop, whose articles appeared in over 300
different newspapers. Other journalists willing to promote the views
of the Central Intelligence Agency included Stewart Alsop (New York
Herald Tribune), Ben Bradlee (Newsweek), James Reston (New York
Times), Charles Douglas Jackson (Time Magazine), Walter Pincus
(Washington Post), William C. Baggs (Miami News), Herb Gold (Miami
News) and Charles Bartlett (Chattanooga Times). These journalists
sometimes wrote articles that were unofficially commissioned by Meyer
was based on leaked classified information from the CIA.
Mary and the family now moved to Washington where they became members
of the Georgetown Crowd. This group included Frank Wisner, George
Kennan, Dean Acheson, Thomas Braden, Richard Bissell, Desmond
FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine
Graham, David Bruce, James Reston, James Truitt, Alfred Friendly,
Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul
Nitze. The Meyers also socialized with other CIA officers or CIA
assets including James Angleton (Cicely Angleton), Wistar Janney (Mary
Wisnar), Ben Bradlee (Antoinette Bradlee) and James Truitt (Anne
Truitt).
Meyer worked under Thomas Braden, the head of International
Organizations Division (IOD). This Central Intelligence Agency unit
helped established anti-Communist front groups in Western Europe.The
IOD was dedicated to infiltrating academic, trade and political
associations. The objective was to control potential radicals and to
steer them to the right.
Meyer oversaw the funding of groups such as the National Student
Association, the Congress of Cultural Freedom, Communications Workers
of America, the American Newspaper Guild and the National Educational
Association. He also provided the money for publishing the journal,
Encounter. Meyer also worked closely with anti-Communist leaders of
the trade union movement such as George Meany of the Congress for
Industrial Organization and the American Federation of Labor.
In 1953 Frank Wisner and the CIA began having trouble with J. Edgar
Hoover. He described the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC) as
"Wisner's gang of weirdos" and began carrying out investigations into
their past. It did not take him long to discover that some of them had
been active in left-wing politics in the 1930s. This information was
passed to Joseph McCarthy who started making attacks on members of the
OPC. Hoover also passed to McCarthy details of an affair that Wisner
had with Princess Caradja in Romania during the war. Hoover, claimed
that Caradja was a Soviet agent.
Joseph McCarthy also began accusing other members of the Georgetown
Crowd as being security risks. McCarthy claimed that the CIA was a
"sinkhole of communists" and claimed he intended to root out a hundred
of them. His first targets were Chip Bohlen and Charles Thayer. Bohlen
survived but Thayer was forced to resign.
In August, 1953, Richard Helms, Wisner's deputy at the OPC, told Meyer
that Joseph McCarthy had accused him of being a communist. The Federal
Bureau of Investigation added to the smear by announcing it was
unwilling to give Meyer "security clearance". However, the FBI refused
to explain what evidence they had against Meyer. Allen W. Dulles and
both came to his defence and refused to permit a FBI interrogation of
Meyer.
The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he
was a member of several liberal groups ...
read more »
Healy was an economic migrant on the make and on the take.
he revealed what he was when he went hiding under Vanessas bed.
Just like fake jews should be kept under close watch by any ostensible
revolutionary groups so economic migrants should be as well.

They were made for each other when multinationals became
transnationals.
They were both against the host nation thats why they blended in so
neatly.

People with open border views who aren't expelled from groups indicate
that nwo politics are like the porous borders. There is no distinction
between
fake left and the globalists whatsoever.

They have merged. A new revolutionary wave will propel them into
insignificance.

vngelis
dusty
2012-01-13 00:11:46 UTC
Permalink
Healy was an economic migrant onthemake and onthetake.
he revealed what he was when he went hiding under Vanessas bed.
Just like fake jews should be kept under close watch by any ostensible
revolutionary groups so economic migrants should be as well.
They were made for each other when multinationals became
transnationals.They were both againstthehost nation thats whythey blended in so
neatly.
People with open border views who aren't expelledfromgroups indicatethat nwo politics are liketheporous borders.There is no distinction
betweenfake left andtheglobalists whatsoever.
They have merged. A new revolutionary wave will propelthem into
insignificance.
vngelis
No other conclusion can be drawn.

This Cord Meyer has a web of intrigue around him, including ties with
the Kennedy assassination:

Obama Deception - JFK, last true U.S. president



...and the "World Government" aspect (I am not referring to the
innocent pacifists, assorted do-gooders in that). The United Nations
has been extensively used to prosecute imperialism and imperialist
wars, the conception of a totally-controlling World Government without
vetoes was hatched early in the peace...by one who "went on (?)" to be
a leader in the CIA.

The project of World Government was and is big enough to allow ALL the
controlling Agendas to be squeezed into it...arms control and
isolating nations on "Human Rights" grounds for the anti-Agenda states
like Iran, Hungary, fake refugee global legislation, unimpeded Israeli
ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians, flooding the West with the Third
World, shelter for the propagators of the Agendas - with GLOBAL "Hate
Crime" legislation there to prevent any public expression of
opposition to it...

Was Cord Meyer a "man before his time" who went on to be a "man of his
time"?


Cord Meyer
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cord Meyer, Jr. (November 10, 1920 – March 13, 2001) was an American
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) official.
Contents
[hide]

1 Early life
2 CIA career
3 Possible Ties to Kennedy Assassination
4 Books
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

[edit] Early life

Meyer's father, Cord Meyer Sr., was a diplomat and former real estate
developer. His grandfather, also called Cord Meyer, was a property
developer and a chairman of the New York State Democratic Committee.
He was educated at St. Paul's School, New Hampshire, and attended Yale
University, where he was a member of the Scroll and Key society.[1]
After graduating in 1942, he enlisted with the 22nd Marine Regiment[2]
and fought in Pacific War; he took part in the Battle of Eniwetok, and
in the Battle of Guam as platoon leader, losing his left eye in a
grenade attack. He shared his war experiences, writing for The
Atlantic Monthly.[3]

In 1945, he married Mary Pinchot, daughter of Amos Pinchot.

After the war, Meyer was a strong advocate of world government. He was
an aide of Harold Stassen to the 1945 San Francisco United Nations
Conference on International Organization and in 1947, was elected
president of the United World Federalists, the organization he helped
to fund.
[edit] CIA career

In about 1949 he started working for the Central Intelligence Agency,
joining the organization in 1951 at the invitation of Allen Dulles. At
first he worked at the Office of Policy Coordination under former OSS
man, Frank Wisner.[4] In 1953 Meyer came under attack by the Federal
Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which claimed he was a security risk
for having once stood at the same podium of a "notorious leftist" and
refused to give him a security clearance. An internal CIA inquiry
summarily dismissed the claims.[5] According to Deborah Davis,[who?]
Meyer became the "principal operative" of Operation Mockingbird, a
plan to secretly influence US and foreign media.[6] Meyer befriended
James Jesus Angleton, who in 1954 became the CIA's counter-
intelligence chief. From 1954 until 1962 Meyer was head of the
agency's international organizations division.[7] In 1959 Meyer's nine-
year-old son Michael was hit by a car and killed. Meyer divorced his
wife Mary Pinchot Meyer shortly thereafter. Meyer headed the Covert
Action Staff of the Directorate of Plans from 1962.[4] In 1964 his
former wife Mary was shot dead by an unknown assailant alongside the
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.[8] Her sister and brother-in-law Benjamin
C. Bradlee, the later Washington Post executive, caught Angleton
breaking into Pinchot's residence. Angleton apparently was looking for
Mary Meyer's diary, which contained details of a love affair with John
F. Kennedy, then U.S. President.[5][9]

From 1967 to 1973 Meyer was Assistant Deputy Director of Plans under
Thomas Karamessines.[3][8] After a posting as CIA station chief in
London, Meyer left the CIA in 1977 and became a syndicated columnist.
He also wrote several books, including an autobiography. He was long
incorrectly considered by some to be Deep Throat.[10]

Writer C. David Heymann in The Georgetown Ladies' Social Club (2003)
told of Meyer's response when, near the end of his life, he was asked
to comment on his wife's still unsolved murder case:

Meyer held court at the beginning of February 2001 - six weeks
before his death - in the barren dining room of a Washington nursing
home. Propped up in a chair, his glass eye bulging, he struggled to
hold his head aloft. Although he was no longer able to read, the
nurses supplied him with a daily copy of The Washington Post, which he
carried with him wherever he went. "My father died of a heart attack
the same year Mary was killed," he whispered. "It was a bad time." And
what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous
crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F.
Kennedy."[11]

He died of lymphoma on March 13, 2001.
[edit] Possible Ties to Kennedy Assassination

In 2007 the son of former CIA agent and Watergate figure E. Howard
Hunt came forward with recordings and other documentation in which his
father, on his death bed, claimed Meyer, William King Harvey, Frank
Sturgis, and David Sanchez Morales organized the assassination of John
F. Kennedy at the behest of then Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. The
audio recordings contain further allegations that prior to the
assassination, JFK had taken Meyer's ex-wife as one of his mistresses.
[12][13][14][15]
[edit] Books
dusty
2012-01-13 00:42:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by dusty
Healy was an economic migrant onthemake and onthetake.
he revealed what he was when he went hiding under Vanessas bed.
Just like fake jews should be kept under close watch by any ostensible
revolutionary groups so economic migrants should be as well.
They were made for each other when multinationals became
transnationals.They were both againstthehost nation thats whythey blended in so
neatly.
People with open border views who aren't expelledfromgroups indicatethat nwo politics are liketheporous borders.There is no distinction
betweenfake left andtheglobalists whatsoever.
They have merged. A new revolutionary wave will propelthem into
insignificance.
vngelis
No other conclusion can be drawn.
This Cord Meyer has a web of intrigue around him, including ties with
Obama Deception - JFK, last true U.S. http://youtu.be/cp9lz0VAvDk
...and the "World Government" aspect (I am not referring to the
innocent pacifists, assorted do-gooders in that). The United Nations
has been extensively used to prosecute imperialism and imperialist
wars, the conception of a totally-controlling World Government without
vetoes was hatched early in the peace...by one who "went on (?)" to be
a leader in the CIA.
The project of World Government was and is big enough to allow ALL the
controlling Agendas to be squeezed into it...arms control and
isolating nations on "Human Rights" grounds for the anti-Agenda states
like Iran, Hungary, fake refugee global legislation, unimpeded Israeli
ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians, flooding the West with the Third
World, shelter for the propagators of the Agendas - with GLOBAL "Hate
Crime" legislation there to prevent any public expression of
opposition to it...
Was Cord Meyer a "man before his time" who went on to be a "man of his
time"?
Confessions of a JFK Killer: E Howard Hunt ½


Confessions of a JFK Killer: E.Howard Hunt. 2/2


JFK Deathbed confession - Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura trutv


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